Is revolution necessary? What form will it take (according to economist Gar Alperovitz)

This “post-ideological” generation believes in the “soft power” of individuals working together as in an NGO or charity rather than trying to change government and 39% believe change requires revolution. As the German Green party said, their goal was to “turn the state into cucumber salad.” The revolution is not to take over the state, but taking present powers from the state, as Peter Waterman emailed. He gave examples of occupying public squares, increased interest in worker self-managed enterprises, alternative universities. Influenced by autonomist Marxists, Chris Carlsson’s Nowtopia (2008) points to US “self-emancipatory class politics” actions including outlaw bicycling, urban gardens, biofuels, and free software.[i] Young activists emphasize “creativity, collaboration, and community” over national politics. British comedian Russell Brand called for a revolution in his 2014 book with that title, focusing on local civil disobedience and cooperation and global communication among those who want to overturn the corrupt system for a more inclusive world. He states that revolution is inevitable and fun.  [i] http://www.chriscarlsson.com/writing/nowtopia-the-book/

Economist Gar Alperovitz confirms that the global corporate capitalist economy is in crisis and decay but state socialism is not the answer. A new decentralized system based on the local community is necessary to create a “pluralist commonwealth.” The US ranks close to the bottom of advanced nations in equality measures, harkening back to medieval feudalism,[i] and faces a health care and climate crisis, yet as many agree, a clear plan is missing. Three options are to let the ship sink as the Roman Empire did, revolution, or to gradually reconstruct more democratic ownership of capital—“wealth democratization” and “evolutionary reconstruction” in the New Economy Movement.[ii] This move towards equality will be the next American Revolution. Alperovitz believes the progressive policies of President Roosevelt’s New Deal and President Johnson’s Great Society were aberrant, with such coherent programs made possible only by the disasters of the stock market crash of 1929 and World War 11. Activism like the Occupy Movement can have little effect without changing the economic system and the power of institutions like large corporations.

Similar to most other critics of neoliberalism, Alperovitz believes that change occurs from the bottom up in worker-owned businesses like the Mondragon Corporation in Spain, co-ops (credit unions are the most numerous in the US), social entrepreneurship and impact/green investing[iii], neighborhood and other small corporations, land trusts, a checkerboard of city-owned businesses such as hotels, and green energy production (Cleveland and Oberlin are models in Ohio), as well as community development corporations that develop housing and small businesses. On a larger scale, state-run health programs, regional programs like the Tennessee Valley authority begun as part of the New Deal, and a national single-payer health insurance are part of the reconstruction. These progressive alternatives from the bottom up create new constituencies and thus a new form of power. People will realize their pain will continue until a new paradigm and new system is developed.

[i] Gar Alperovitz. What Then Must We Do? Straight Talk About the Next American Revolution. Chelsea Green Publishing, 2013, p. 2-4.

[ii] Gar Alperovitz, p. 134.

[iii] The Global Impact Investing Netowrk defines how to measure business impacts

shttp://www.thegiin.org/cgi-bin/iowa/home/index.html

 

Economist Gar Alperovitz confirms that the global corporate capitalist economy is in crisis and decay but state socialism is not the answer. A new decentralized system based on the local community is necessary to create a “pluralist commonwealth.” The US ranks close to the bottom of advanced nations in equality measures, harkening back to medieval feudalism,[i] and faces a health care and climate crisis, yet as many agree, a clear plan is missing. Three options are to let the ship sink as the Roman Empire did, revolution, or to gradually reconstruct more democratic ownership of capital—“wealth democratization” and “evolutionary reconstruction” in the New Economy Movement.[ii] This move towards equality will be the next American Revolution. Alperovitz believes the progressive policies of President Roosevelt’s New Deal and President Johnson’s Great Society were aberrant, with such coherent programs made possible only by the disasters of the stock market crash of 1929 and World War 11. Activism like the Occupy Movement can have little effect without changing the economic system and the power of institutions like large corporations.

Similar to most other critics of neoliberalism, Alperovitz believes that change occurs from the bottom up in worker-owned businesses like the Mondragon Corporation in Spain, co-ops (credit unions are the most numerous in the US), social entrepreneurship and impact/green investing[iii], neighborhood and other small corporations, land trusts, a checkerboard of city-owned businesses such as hotels, and green energy production (Cleveland and Oberlin are models in Ohio), as well as community development corporations that develop housing and small businesses. On a larger scale, state-run health programs, regional programs like the Tennessee Valley authority begun as part of the New Deal, and a national single-payer health insurance are part of the reconstruction. These progressive alternatives from the bottom up create new constituencies and thus a new form of power. People will realize their pain will continue until a new paradigm and new system is developed.

[i] Gar Alperovitz. What Then Must We Do? Straight Talk About the Next American Revolution. Chelsea Green Publishing, 2013, p. 2-4.

[ii] Gar Alperovitz, p. 134.

[iii] The Global Impact Investing Netowrk defines how to measure business impacts

shttp://www.thegiin.org/cgi-bin/iowa/home/index.html

 

Economist Gar Alperovitz confirms that the global corporate capitalist economy is in crisis and decay but state socialism is not the answer. A new decentralized system based on the local community is necessary to create a “pluralist commonwealth.” The US ranks close to the bottom of advanced nations in equality measures, harkening back to medieval feudalism,[i] and faces a health care and climate crisis, yet as many agree, a clear plan is missing. Three options are to let the ship sink as the Roman Empire did, revolution, or to gradually reconstruct more democratic ownership of capital—“wealth democratization” and “evolutionary reconstruction” in the New Economy Movement.[ii] This move towards equality will be the next American Revolution. Alperovitz believes the progressive policies of President Roosevelt’s New Deal and President Johnson’s Great Society were aberrant, with such coherent programs made possible only by the disasters of the stock market crash of 1929 and World War 11. Activism like the Occupy Movement can have little effect without changing the economic system and the power of institutions like large corporations.

Similar to most other critics of neoliberalism, Alperovitz believes that change occurs from the bottom up in worker-owned businesses like the Mondragon Corporation in Spain, co-ops (credit unions are the most numerous in the US), social entrepreneurship and impact/green investing[iii], neighborhood and other small corporations, land trusts, a checkerboard of city-owned businesses such as hotels, and green energy production (Cleveland and Oberlin are models in Ohio), as well as community development corporations that develop housing and small businesses. On a larger scale, state-run health programs, regional programs like the Tennessee Valley authority begun as part of the New Deal, and a national single-payer health insurance are part of the reconstruction. These progressive alternatives from the bottom up create new constituencies and thus a new form of power. People will realize their pain will continue until a new paradigm and new system is developed.

[i] Gar Alperovitz. What Then Must We Do? Straight Talk About the Next American Revolution. Chelsea Green Publishing, 2013, p. 2-4.

[ii] Gar Alperovitz, p. 134.

[iii] The Global Impact Investing Netowrk defines how to measure business impacts

shttp://www.thegiin.org/cgi-bin/iowa/home/index.html

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