European 25-year-old on youth unemployment

I interviewed Demi, age 25, to talk about youth unemployment issues, when we were in Greece, seen on video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GgCKueSGWck). A global citizen, born in Israel, he moved to Greece when he was seven where he went to French language school, and then he went to university in Italy. His fifth language is English. He reported about his unpaid internship and not yet finding a job.

 

Things have changed; we’re the victims of the economic situation worldwide. We can adapt to new jobs but the problem is employers take advantage of us with unpaid internships. Many of my friends have continued their graduate studies to be able to have their dream work, because they can’t get a job without graduate degrees. In Italy employers don’t start paying their workers until they’re around 30 years old, using the excuse you don’t have experience. To survive, they live with parents, or have a second job as something like a waitress, along with an unpaid internship. In Greece, young people with a dream leave the country to find work. I would like to believe that in my 50s or 60s I could come back to Greece to bring my experience and something new.

 

I asked Demi if governments are helping his generation get jobs. Despite claims that his generation is apolitical, he said, “I’m very political; I’d like to work in cultural politics sector, because I’d like to improve things.” He’s thinking about moving to Belgium to work for the EU. A centrist in his political views, he’s on the right about the economy and on the left about social policies. He’s very accepting of diversity and equality for women and GLBT people.

 

The politicians are always the same, they’re corrupt, and do things in their own interest. Young people really are not understood by adults, but we’re much more mature because of the economic problems. We’re well-informed because social networks help provide information on everything. There is no ignorance any more, although politicians think young people are ignorant. I want to believe my generation will change things a lot.

 

 

In Europe, almost a quarter of youth are unemployed. The European Union set aside around $8 billion in 2013 to invest over a period of seven years on work programs for youth under age 25 to provide a job or training, called the Youth Guarantee. Finland is a trendsetter as 83% of unemployed youth who registered with the program in 2011 had a job within three months (it also experimented with a $600 basic income in 2016.) I interviewed Demi, age 25, to talk about youth unemployment issues, when we were in Greece, seen on video. A global citizen, born in Israel, he moved to Greece when he was seven where he went to French language school, and then he went to university in Italy. His fifth language is English. He reported about his unpaid internship and not yet finding a job.

 

Things have changed; we’re the victims of the economic situation worldwide. We can adapt to new jobs but the problem is employers take advantage of us with unpaid internships. Many of my friends have continued their graduate studies to be able to have their dream work, because they can’t get a job without graduate degrees. In Italy employers don’t start paying their workers until they’re around 30 years old, using the excuse you don’t have experience. To survive, they live with parents, or have a second job as something like a waitress, along with an unpaid internship. In Greece, young people with a dream leave the country to find work. I would like to believe that in my 50s or 60s I could come back to Greece to bring my experience and something new.

 

I asked Demi if governments are helping his generation get jobs. Despite claims that his generation is apolitical, he said, “I’m very political; I’d like to work in cultural politics sector, because I’d like to improve things.” He’s thinking about moving to Belgium to work for the EU. A centrist in his political views, he’s on the right about the economy and on the left about social policies. He’s very accepting of diversity and equality for women and GLBT people.

 

The politicians are always the same, they’re corrupt, and do things in their own interest. Young people really are not understood by adults, but we’re much more mature because of the economic problems. We’re well-informed because social networks help provide information on everything. There is no ignorance any more, although politicians think young people are ignorant. I want to believe my generation will change things a lot.

 

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