Monthly Archives: May 2017

Brave flyer

 

Brave: The Global Women’s Revolution

Gayle Kimball, Ph.D.

Textbook for Global Feminisms and Intro to WSt

Ebook $10 and print paperback on demand

Contact Equality Press gkimball@csuchico.edu for exam copy

Chapters on seven regions, the future is female, global desire for equality, global status of women, consumerism, and global media.

https://globalyouthbook.wordpress.com/

The cover photo is a poster in Tahrir Square, taken by the author July 2011. The protesters’ tents are in the background.

 

Introduction 25

Part 1 Themes

Chapter 1 The Future is Female 67 pages

Meet Young Women Leaders; What Motivates a Youth Activist?; the Future is Female?; Uppity Girls’ Rising Aspirations and Activism; Feminism, the United Nations and Governments Stimulate Equality; Young Men’s Viewpoints

 

Chapter 2 Global Desire for Equality 55

Equality is Desired Globally, More Females Desire Gender Equality, Girls Want Economic and Social Equality, Claims that Women Leaders are More Peaceful, Feminist Organizing, Inequality Persists in All Countries

 

Chapter 3 Global Status of Young Women 55

Rural Vs. Urban Sex Roles, Feminization of Poverty, Education, Health, Violence

 

Chapter 4 Consumerism Targets “Girl Power” 44

Materialistic Consumers of Products and Entertainment?; Teen Identity Through Consumption; Social Unrest from Rising Expectations; How Youth Are Manipulated by Multinational Corporations; Negative Consequences of Consumerism; Youth Views about Getting Rich; Traditional and Modern Beliefs: Moving Towards the Middle

 

Chapter 5 Global Media Both Helps and Inhibits Girls 60

Global Media is Pervasive, Global Media Provides New Information, Media Exposure Makes Youth Opinionated and Brave, Global Media Sells Consumerism, Media Addiction Creates Dumb Zombies

 

Part 2 Regions

Chapter 6 Feminist Waves in the West 97

Second Wave Feminists of the 60s, Women’s Studies, Inequality Persists, Generation Gap, Third Wave Response, Rejection of Feminism?, Fourth Wave

 

Chapter 7 Brave Women in Muslim Countries 61

The Middle East, Women and Islam, Iran, Tunisia, Yemen, Libya, Morocco, Turkey, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia

 

Chapter 8 Egyptian Revolutionaries 44

Traditional Male Dominance; Education; A Pioneering Feminist: Dr. Nawal El Saadawi’s Egyptian Union for Women; Young Women in the Revolution; After the Revolution; Sexual Harassment Persists

 

Chapter 9 Women in Developing and Emerging Countries: Latin America 59

Women and Development, Latin American Youth Issues

 

Chapter 10 African Issues and Activists 44,

 

Chapter 11 Socialist Countries–China 44

The Setting, Traditional Beliefs, Rural vs. Urban Youth, Youth Issues in an Era of Change from Maoism to Capitalism, Current Chinese Issues

 

Chapter 12 Russia 28

History, Attitudes Towards Feminism, Consumerism and Glamour, Putin’s Nationalism vs. Rebels

 

Other Books by the Author

50/50 Marriage (Beacon Press)

50/50 Parenting (Lexington Books)

Ed. Women’s Culture (Scarecrow Press)

Ed. Women’s Culture Revisited. (Scarecrow Press, 2005)

The Religious Ideas of Harriet Beecher Stowe. Edwin Mellen Press.

Essential Energy Tools book and 3 videos. (Equality Press)

21st Century Families: Blueprints for Family-Friendly Workplaces,

Schools and Governments. (Equality Press)

The Teen Trip: The Complete Resource Guide (Equality Press)

Ed. Everything You Need to Know to Succeed After College (Equality

Press)

How to Survive Your Parents’ Divorce (Equality Press)

Ed., Quick Healthy Recipes: Literacy Fundraiser (Equality Press)

Your Mindful Guide to Academic Success: Beat Burnout (Equality Press)

Ageism in Youth Studies: A Maligned Generation (Cambridge Scholars Publishing)

 

In Process

Democracy Uprisings Led by Global Youth

Tactics and Goals for Changemaking

Recent Feminism in India

 

Decreases in US College Diversity

Overall increases in tuition and state universities accepting more out-of-state and foreign students who pay higher tuition has led to decline in low-income students in top public colleges.[i] The problem is caused by state spending on higher education that decreased by 18% since 2008, according to the Center of Budget and Policy Priorities. The College Access Index keeps track of student income; it found that the average percentage of first year students who received Pell grants, indicating they come from the bottom half of family income, fell from 24% in 2012 to 22% in 2016. Some colleges also cope by accepting more students, leading to crowding.

[i] David Leonhardt, “The Assault on Colleges—and the American Dream,” New York Times, May 25, 2017.

Child Marriage a Problem in the US too

Child marriage is one of the most harmful traditional practices for girls, undermining their chances for education and health, illustrated in a short video “Too Young to Wed”[i] and opposed by the global coalition of hundreds of organizations called “Girls Not Brides.” Globally, a girl marries before she is 15 every seven seconds, according to Save the Children. Many don’t realized it’s a problem in the US, especially in certain states like Idado and Kentucky, often used to prevent legal action about rape of a minor or in religious fundamentalist families.[ii] When a Girl Scout in New Hampshire heard that a 13-year-old girl was allowed to marry in her state, she found a legislator to sponsor a bill to raise the age of marriage from 13 to 18. Republican legislators made fun of Cassandra Levesque’s “Girl Scout project” and killed the bill.

A group of world leaders called The Elders founded an organization in 2011 to lobby for girls’ rights.[iii]

[i] http://bit.ly/1QVetXD

[ii] Nicholas Krisof, “11 Years Old, a Mom, and Pushed to Marry Her Rapist in Florida,” New York Times, May 26, 2017.https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/26/opinion/sunday/it-was-forced-on-me-child-marriage-in-the-us.html?emc=edit_th_20170528&nl=todaysheadlines&nlid=68143430

[iii] http://www.girlsnotbrides.org

Acts of Kindness suggested by 6 and 7 year olds

Acts of Kindness suggested by 6- and 7-year-old first graders at Chico Country Day school in California, published as illustrated kindness cards. I organized their suggestions by theme.

Family

Leave secret happy notes for your family for them to find around the house. Make breakfast in bed for your parents. Empty the dishwasher to giver your mom a break. Wait if your mom is talking: Be Patient. Help your dad and mom make a meal for your family to show you care about your family. Do your chores to make your mom and dad happy. Clean the bathroom. Help your parents with chores. Clean your room to help your parents out. Take care of your siblings. Play nice with your brothers and sisters. Read a book to a family member or friend.

.

Neighborhood

Bring in a neighbor’s trash can or help weed their yard or pick up dog poop. Get a friend and organize a neighborhood cleanup. Clean up garbage in your neighborhood. Put on gloves and get dirty. Help a neighbor in their garden.

 

School

Organize an all-school clean. Donate balls and hula-hoops to the school. Pick up trash at your school

 

Environment

Turn off the lights when you’re not using them. It is kind for the earth. Make a compost pile. Use containers that can be used again in your lunchbox. . Buy recycled materials like clothing. Grow an organic garden to grow healthy food. Start a community garden. Plant a tree to help the earth.

 

The poor, sick and elders

Make a card for a person in a retirement home or visit and sing them songs. Send a card to your grandma. Send postcards to children in the hospital.

Make lemonade stand and donate the money to help people buy food. Collect socks for the homeless.

Donate old toys to children who don’t have any. Donate money to those in need.

Donate canned food to a homeless shelter.

 

Animals

Collect pet supplies for the Humane Society. Rescue a pet from a shelter. Make a bird feeder. Take your dog for a walk. Play with your dog.

 

Random acts of kindness

Bake cookies for someone. Smile. Write a poem for someone. Or draw a picture. Give someone flowers. Say please and thank you.

Hold a door open for someone.

Donate clothes that are too small for you. Donate books to the library

Help someone learn something new. Share your expertise.

Volunteer.

Give our compliments to your friends.

 

Black Lives Matter Platform (& Resources)

An umbrella of over 50 BLM organizations released a platform calling for racial justice, titled “A Vision for Black Lives: Policy Demands for Black Power, Freedom, & Justice.” [i] The website includes many position briefs including a section on “An Immediate End to the Criminalization and Dehumanization of Black Youth Across All Areas of Society Including, but Not Limited to, Our Nation’s Justice and Education Systems, Social Service Agencies, Media, and Pop Culture.” Part of its global intersectionality, the platform supported the Palestinian struggle against the “apartheid state” of Israel, along with the BDS movement to Boycott, Divest and Sanction Israel.

[i] https://policy.m4bl.org

Chinese and Japanese Gender-Bending Bands

Japanese entertainers and fashionistas experiment with gender-bending in their clothes and makeup, including androgynous boy bands.[i] Acrush is a similar group of five young women who dress like boys, intended to replace the South Korean bands that were unofficially banned by Beijing in 2016. A promoter explained, “there are so many androgynous-looking girls these days, we thought they would be more relatable.” [ii]One of the singers said, “My family has always thought that girls should look and act like girls. But for my generation, we think: My life is my own life.”

[i] Jennifer Robertson, “Japan’s Gender-Bending History,” The Conversation, February 28, 2017.

http://theconversation.com/japans-gender-bending-history-71545

[ii] Amy Qin, “The 5 ‘Handsome Girls’ Trying to be China’s Biggest Boy Band,” New York Times, May 20, 2017.