Monthly Archives: October 2018

ways to teach civil discourse to students

https://theconversation.com/7-ways-to-teach-civil-discourse-to-students-105724?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20October%2030%202018%20-%201148810366&utm_content=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20October%2030%202018%20-%201148810366+Version+A+CID_091c30badb21634e1a053466541e4117&utm_source=campaign_monitor_us&utm_term=7%20ways%20to%20teach%20civil%20discourse%20to%20students

Dutch teenagers are happy!

The Netherlands has done its homework. Read more: https://wef.ch/2yuaNgl

The Dutch have high levels of happiness across all age groups.
Image: REUTERS/Cris Toala Olivares

Exam pressures, the quest for more independence, strained relationships with parents and a body full of raging hormones all add to teenage angst. Of course not all teenagers have the same experience of these formative years, and where they live has a huge influence on an important time of their lives.

If all teenagers could choose where to grow up, the Netherlands would be a good pick. Young people there are highly likely to have a positive experience of their teenage years.

They are, on average, likely to be among the happiest, healthiest, best educated and wealthiest of adolescents living in the world’s richest nations.

Earlier this year, an OECD report found that over 93% of children aged 11 to 15 years old in the Netherlands recorded above average life satisfaction.

And subsequent reports by UNICEF have listed the Netherlands as one of the best places in the world for children and teenagers to live.

Image: UNICEF

When UNICEF assessed the well-being of children and teenagers in OECD nations in 2013, the Netherlands came top overall. It also topped the individual categories for material well-being, educational well-being, and for behaviours and risks.

Dutch teenagers are among the least likely to engage in risky behaviour, including getting pregnant and drinking alcohol.

A subsequent UNICEF report in 2017 found that teenage girls in the Netherlands were the least likely in the world to experience violence.

And reports published last year by UNICEF and the World Health Organization found that the Netherlands has the lowest obesity rates among rich nations.

Work-life balance

Dutch teenagers’ health and happiness appears to reflect the health and happiness of the Dutch population overall.

This year, once again, the Netherlands ranked in the top 10 of the Global Happiness Index.

In a world where mental health problems are on the rise, the Netherlands remains one of the OECD nations with the lowest use of antidepressants per capita.

Perhaps the secret to widespread happiness in the Netherlands, and the happiness of its teenagers in particular, is the country’s work-life balance.

Image: OECD

This year’s OECD Better Life Index found that the Dutch have the best work-life balance of any developed nation.

Only 0.5% of Dutch employees regularly work very long hours, which is the lowest rate in the OECD, where the average is 13%. Overall, they work an average of just 30.3 hours per week, well below the EU average of 40.3 hours per week.

Instead, they devote around 16 hours per day to eating, sleeping and leisurely pursuits.

The Dutch also spend time together as families, which is reflected in the strength of the relationships teenagers in the Netherlands have with their parents.

Among European teenagers, research by the World Health Organization found 15-year-olds in the Netherlands find it easiest to talk to their parents.

interesting interviews on YouTube

Consider subscribing to Dr. Gayle’s YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYQz9QMYs2b1R1uAKnMzWQQ?fbclid=IwAR2246BAhbtZZ9MPiXY-P4a3EDQOEm9IfLpbhVKKTcES7P2i-K68H-biSB8

Interviews with global youth and adult panels from her radio show, as well as dance videos.

Teen Climate Activist in Finland

https://www.commondreams.org/news/2018/10/20/teen-climate-activist-crowd-thousands-we-cant-save-world-playing-rules-because-rules?cd-origin=rss&utm_term=Teen%20Climate%20Activist%20to%20Crowd%20of%20Thousands%3A%20%27We%20Can%27t%20Save%20the%20World%20by%20Playing%20by%20the%20Rules%20Because%20the%20Rules%20Have%20to%20Change%27&utm_campaign=Weekly%20Newsletter%20-%20During%20Fundraiser%20-%20With%20Fundraising%20Message&utm_content=email&utm_source=Act-On+Software&utm_medium=email&cm_mmc=Act-On%20Software-_-email-_-%27Caught%20Red%20Handed%27%20%7C%20Your%20Week%20In%20Review%20-_-Teen%20Climate%20Activist%20to%20Crowd%20of%20Thousands%3A%20%27We%20Can%27t%20Save%20the%20World%20by%20Playing%20by%20the%20Rules%20Because%20the%20Rules%20Have%20to%20Change%27

Tanzanian President Opposes Contraception

https://theconversation.com/tanzanian-president-bluntly-attacks-contraception-saying-high-birth-rates-are-good-for-economy-103513?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20October%2025%202018%20-%201144610321&utm_content=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20October%2025%202018%20-%201144610321+CID_4d21fd0f746308dbfd4621471f349a8b&utm_source=campaign_monitor_us&utm_term=Tanzanian%20president%20bluntly%20attacks%20contraception%20saying%20high%20birth%20rates%20are%20good%20for%20economy

1st generation students earn less

https://theconversation.com/first-generation-college-students-earn-less-than-graduates-whose-parents-went-to-college-103276?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20October%2025%202018%20-%201144610321&utm_content=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20October%2025%202018%20-%201144610321+CID_4d21fd0f746308dbfd4621471f349a8b&utm_source=campaign_monitor_us&utm_term=First-generation%20college%20students%20earn%20less%20than%20graduates%20whose%20parents%20went%20to%20college

Never Again Gun Control Movement: Summary of “Glimmer of Hope” tactics and goals

In their anthology titled Glimmer of Hope: How Tragedy Sparked a Movement by the Founders of March for Our Lives (2018), 16 leaders of the Never Again movement for gun control described their tactics and goals. All but one are present or recent graduates from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, where 17 people were killed in a school shooting on Valentine’s Day in 2018. Their main focus is on getting young people to register to vote and to actually vote as they think voting is the key to making political change. They toured 22 states in the summer to get out the vote and then concentrated on college campuses. They don’t have faith in existing legislators who they believe are corrupt and in bondage to their large contributors of campaign funding such as the National Rifle Association. They warned “all the politicians out there, if you take money from the NRA, you have chosen death.”[1] They judged the legislators they lobbied in Florida and in Congress to be uninformed, not interested in listening to young people without a lot of money, “almost untouchable,” dismissive, concerned only about getting photo ops to help their next campaign.[2] They tend to view adults in general as failures who created a broken system. They require any adult who assists them to have a youth point person to make sure their message isn’t diluted.

The students are confident that their generation is uniquely positioned to lead revolutionary change because of the information they gain from the Internet plus their skills using social media, which they believe is the key to outreach. Some of them, like Charlie Mirsky, Cameron Kasky, and David Hogg grew up interested in politics, sparked by listen to TV comedians who discuss the news such as Stephen Colbert and John Oliver. Kasky said, “I grew up consuming political media like it was candy,” formerly a “rebel without a cause.” [3] Growing up with superheroes and Harry Potter, Delaney Tarr said they find themselves “wanting to be these powerhouse, these superheroes who come in and just save the day.”[4] Cameron Kasky greeting the millions of people in the march on Washington with “Welcome to the revolution.” He said, “Don’t worry, we’ve got this.” They have “an incredibly powerful tool: an outlet to millions of people all over the world at our fingertips.”[5] Matt Deitsch promised, “The youth will fix this great nation and truly lead us to a more compassionate future. We can only do this together and with love.”[6] They also acknowledge previous youth activists such as the civil rights era Freedom Riders.

Their worldview emphasizes intersectionality, the importance of including diversity, as in their outreach to African American youth activists in Chicago, Washington, DC, etc. They don’t have to go through a third party but can communicate directly with their networks. Jammal Lemy designed “merch” such as T-shirts and hats with a QR (quick response code) barcode to scan to register to vote. He believes that “art is the most effective media to convey messages.”[7] They’re also unique in the youth of activists such as Naomi Wadlin, an eighth grader who led a school walk-out in Alexandria, Virginia, on March 14 or Yolanda Renee King, the granddaughter of Martin Luther King, Jr. who spoke at the Washington, DC march when she was age nine.

Specific tactics they articulated are individuals need a specific task or they won’t do anything and it’s vital to move beyond anger (and fear generated by frequent threats and harassment) to find joy and love in organizing. They think of their core group of 25 activists as a supportive family that helped them build on their grief at the loss of their friends to build a social movement. (Therapy dogs provided at school also helped them cope.) Emotion is important as “This is a movement relying on the persistence and passion of its people.”[8] They often quote Matt Deitch who urges that “leaders create leaders,” typical of recent organizing that is wary of dominant leaders. They emphasize being nonpartisan to shape an inclusive message as negative forces “will try to separate us by demographics…by religion, race, congressional district and class. They will fail. We will come together.”[9]

[1] The founders. Glimmer of Hope. Penguin, 2018, p.. 175

[2] P. 99

[3] P. 6

[4] P. 97

[5] P. 39

[6] P. 208

[7] P. 198

[8] P. 163

[9] P. 152