Author Archives: Gayle Kimball, Ph.D.

About Gayle Kimball, Ph.D.

*Author of 12 books *Ph.D. in Religious Studies from UCSB *Life coach *Founder of Open Doors Literacy Project in Pakistan *See Global Youth SpeakOut and NGOs small & global on FB Gayle Kimball Vita Degrees * BA, UC Berkley * Teaching credential,UCB * MA, UCLA * MA, UCSB * Ph.D., UCSB (Religious Studies) Teaching * LA City Schools, history teacher * CSU, Chico, Professor of Women's Studies and Sociology * Teacher and director, Earth Haven: Center for Spiritual Enrichment Books * Essential Energy Tools (Book, 2 CDs, and 3 videos) * 21st Century Families: Blueprints for Family-Friendly Workplaces, Schools and Governments. (Equality Press) * Energy Tools for Success (Equality Press) * How to Create Your Ideal Workplace (Equality Press) * The Teen Trip: The Complete Resource Guide (Equality Press) * 50/50 Parenting (Lexington Books) * 50/50 Marriage (Beacon Press) * ed. Everything You Need to Know to Succeed After College (Equality Press) * How to Survive Your Parents' Divorce (Equality Press) * ed. Women's Culture (Scarecrow Press). * Numerous videotapes. Media Appearances * ABC National News * Geraldo * Hour Magazine * Late Night America * The Michael Jackson radio show * Regional TV and radio shows (i.e. Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Denver)

Did the Youth-Led Arab Spring Succeed or Fail? Juan Cole’s answer.

Historian Juan Cole maintains that the young activists did lead successful revolutions, defining revolution as a rapid change in social and political institutions and attitudes caused by a social movement.[i] Various social movements acting together create a revolution. Specifically, the radical youth stopped the practice of presidents for life turning power over to their sons as Mubarak was planning to do in Egypt. They disrupted the financial control of the ousted presidents and their allies in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya. Also, they opened up discussion of political issues and youth unemployment and creation of new political parties. What youth most wanted was karama (dignity), individual rights and freedom similar to social democracy in Nordic countries. Cole said they made “new social and media spaces in which their demands could be voiced.” However, they were naïve to think that deposing an autocrat would change the oppressive system. After the revolutions, they turned their focus from government to organizing thousands of new NGOs, where they continue to use their horizontal and pragmatic organizational skills. He predicts, “They have kicked off what is likely to be a long intergenerational argument.” Because the key problem of youth unemployment hasn’t been solved, they will continue to “agitate for change” having had practice in how to mobilize and network.[ii]

[i] Juan Cole. The New Arabs: How the Millennial Generation is Changing the Middle East. Simon & Schuster, 2014, pp. x-xiv.

[ii] Ibid., p. 270.

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5 Girl Activists

http://www.yesmagazine.org/people-power/when-girls-take-the-lead-on-social-justice-5-stories-20180622?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=YTW_20180622&utm_content=YTW_20180622+Version+A+CID_8fff32c0f49553946658973904aca9be&utm_source=CM&utm_term=When%20Girls%20Take%20the%20Lead%20on%20Social%20Justice%205%20Stories

How to Encourage Girls in STEM fields

https://theconversation.com/heres-how-to-encourage-more-girls-to-pursue-science-and-math-careers-98229?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=The%20Weekend%20Conversation%20-%20106399431&utm_content=The%20Weekend%20Conversation%20-%20106399431+CID_6e12b293db390cfa8511f12d3cb55499&utm_source=campaign_monitor_us&utm_term=Heres%20how%20to%20encourage%20more%20girls%20to%20pursue%20science%20and%20math%20careers

Brits Protest Trump

https://www.commondreams.org/news/2018/07/13/brits-dont-mince-words-most-irreverent-and-radical-signs-uks-historic-anti-trump?cd-origin=rss&utm_term=Brits%20Don%27t%20Mince%20Words%3A%20The%20Most%20Irreverent%20and%20Radical%20Signs%20From%20UK%27s%20Historic%20Anti-Trump%20Protest&utm_campaign=News%20%2526%20Views%20%7C%20%27World%20of%20Justice%20Not%20Division%27%3A%20Hundreds%20of%20Thousands%20March%20Against%20Trump%20in%20UK&utm_content=email&utm_source=Daily%20Newsletter&utm_medium=Email&cm_mmc=Act-On%20Software-_-email-_-News%20%2526%20Views%20%7C%20%27World%20of%20Justice%20Not%20Division%27%3A%20Hundreds%20of%20Thousands%20March%20Against%20Trump%20in%20UK-_-Brits%20Don%27t%20Mince%20Words%3A%20The%20Most%20Irreverent%20and%20Radical%20Signs%20From%20UK%27s%20Historic%20Anti-Trump%20Protest

B. Obama’s Africa Reading List

Obama, 7-13-18

This week, I’m traveling to Africa for the first time since I left office – a continent of wonderful diversity, thriving culture, and remarkable stories.

Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe
A true classic of world literature, this novel paints a picture of traditional society wrestling with the arrival of foreign influence, from Christian missionaries to British colonialism. A masterpiece that has inspired generations of writers in Nigeria, across Africa, and around the world.

A Grain of Wheat by Ngugi wa Thiong’o
A chronicle of the events leading up to Kenya’s independence, and a compelling story of how the transformative events of history weigh on individual lives and relationships.

Long Walk to Freedom by Nelson Mandela
Mandela’s life was one of the epic stories of the 20th century. This definitive memoir traces the arc of his life from a small village, to his years as a revolutionary, to his long imprisonment, and ultimately his ascension to unifying President, leader, and global icon. Essential reading for anyone who wants to understand history – and then go out and change it.

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
From one of the world’s great contemporary writers comes the story of two Nigerians making their way in the U.S. and the UK, raising universal questions of race and belonging, the overseas experience for the African diaspora, and the search for identity and a home.

The Return by Hisham Matar
A beautifully-written memoir that skillfully balances a graceful guide through Libya’s recent history with the author’s dogged quest to find his father who disappeared in Gaddafi’s prisons.

The World As It Is by Ben Rhodes
It’s true, Ben does not have African blood running through his veins. But few others so closely see the world through my eyes like he can. Ben’s one of the few who’ve been with me since that first presidential campaign. His memoir is one of the smartest reflections I’ve seen as to how we approached foreign policy, and one of the most compelling stories I’ve seen about what it’s actually like to serve the American people for eight years in the White House.

 

#NeverAgain gun control activists explain their tactics

David Hogg and Lauren Hogg. #Never Again. Random House, 2018.
What tactics did these Parkland, Florida, savvy and outspoken teenagers use to make so much happen so fast in the gun control movement? David Hogg explained in his #NeverAgain book that they were very disorganized and as teenagers, no one liked being told what to do. If someone had a good idea, they did it, without asking for approval. Individuals focused on what they did well, such as tweeting, giving interviews, or organizing. He said they didn’t have a plan or hire consultants and focus groups, but communicated the way they were used to online. They started by “going to war with the NRA” with tweets suggesting companies end their special deals with the NRA, which gave the students a “bigger stage” of national attention. Gonzales quickly gained more Twitter followers than the NRA. They picked a few clear goals and picked their battles, ignoring trolls but challenging well-known people like Laura Ingraham who criticized his question, “What if our politicians weren’t the bitch of the NRA?” They weren’t respectful of people in authority like Senator Marco Rubio. What Hogg said made them succeed is they “obsessively” stuck to the task of changing the national discussion about gun control, often spending the night at Cameron’s house and waking up with another idea. After the March for Our Lives in Washington, DC, they organized into committees. Hogg said Gonzales is the only “non-type A” person in the group, the “peaceful radiance at the center of all the spinning wheels.” He advises activists to stay loving and “never, ever stop pointing at the naked emperor.”

Recent Middle Eastern Gender Attitudes: Women’s Place is in the Home

A survey that doesn’t offer much hope for the future, the UN Women and Promundo survey of 10,000 people in Egypt, Morocco, Lebanon and Palestine reported in 2017 that 87 percent of Egyptian men and 77 percent of Egyptian women believed that women’s role is to “care for the home” and 90 percent of men and 58.5 percent of women believed that men should make the final decisions (El-Behary, 2017). Over half the men and one-third of women thought that women sometimes deserve to be beaten and half the women and 70 percent of men supported female genital cutting (FGM). Only a quarter of the men and 42 percent of women believed that women should have the same freedom to access the Internet.

Younger men were not more liberal; the study authors suggested that the difficult economic situation produced a backlash as unemployed men feel insecure about their masculinity and they were raised in an increasingly conservative Islamic climate. Younger men were more opposed to women politicians than older men. About half of the women in the four countries also had traditional views, although educated people are more likely to support gender equality.

On the hopeful side of the survey, two-thirds of Egyptian men surveyed supported gender equity in education, equal pay for both genders and were willing to work with women. Three-quarters of Egyptian women wanted the same right to work; however, the study showed that almost 90 percent of women believed that men’s employment is more important “if employment is scarce,” which it is. Many more Egyptian women believed that women could be the leaders of political parties, 76 percent compared to 39 percent of men.  As long as Egyptians vote for a military “pharaoh” inequality will remain.

El-Behary, H. (May 8, 2017). 87 percent of Egyptian men believe women’s basic role is to be housewives. The Independent. Retrieved from

http://www.egyptindependent.com/87-egyptian-men-believe-women-s-basic-role-be-housewives-study/

Suggested Reading

Nermin Allam. Women and the Egyptian Revolution: Engagement and Activism during the 2011 Arab Uprisings. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 2017

Mona Prince and Samia Mehrez. Revolution Is My Name: An Egyptian Woman’s Diary from Eighteen Days in Tahrir by 2015. (Prince ran for president of Egypt in 2012.) Cairo, Egypt: The American University in Cairo Press, 2015.

Samia Mehrez. Translating Egypt’s Revolution: The Language of Tahrir. Cairo, Egypt: The American University in Cairo Press, 2012.

Samia Mehrez, ed. Arts and the Uprising in Egypt: the Making of a Culture of

Ahdaf Soueif. Cairo: My City, Our Revolution. London: Bloomsbury Publishing, 2012.