Category Archives: Beliefs

Recent Middle Eastern Gender Attitudes: Women’s Place is in the Home

A survey that doesn’t offer much hope for the future, the UN Women and Promundo survey of 10,000 people in Egypt, Morocco, Lebanon and Palestine reported in 2017 that 87 percent of Egyptian men and 77 percent of Egyptian women believed that women’s role is to “care for the home” and 90 percent of men and 58.5 percent of women believed that men should make the final decisions (El-Behary, 2017). Over half the men and one-third of women thought that women sometimes deserve to be beaten and half the women and 70 percent of men supported female genital cutting (FGM). Only a quarter of the men and 42 percent of women believed that women should have the same freedom to access the Internet.

Younger men were not more liberal; the study authors suggested that the difficult economic situation produced a backlash as unemployed men feel insecure about their masculinity and they were raised in an increasingly conservative Islamic climate. Younger men were more opposed to women politicians than older men. About half of the women in the four countries also had traditional views, although educated people are more likely to support gender equality.

On the hopeful side of the survey, two-thirds of Egyptian men surveyed supported gender equity in education, equal pay for both genders and were willing to work with women. Three-quarters of Egyptian women wanted the same right to work; however, the study showed that almost 90 percent of women believed that men’s employment is more important “if employment is scarce,” which it is. Many more Egyptian women believed that women could be the leaders of political parties, 76 percent compared to 39 percent of men.  As long as Egyptians vote for a military “pharaoh” inequality will remain.

El-Behary, H. (May 8, 2017). 87 percent of Egyptian men believe women’s basic role is to be housewives. The Independent. Retrieved from

http://www.egyptindependent.com/87-egyptian-men-believe-women-s-basic-role-be-housewives-study/

Suggested Reading

Nermin Allam. Women and the Egyptian Revolution: Engagement and Activism during the 2011 Arab Uprisings. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 2017

Mona Prince and Samia Mehrez. Revolution Is My Name: An Egyptian Woman’s Diary from Eighteen Days in Tahrir by 2015. (Prince ran for president of Egypt in 2012.) Cairo, Egypt: The American University in Cairo Press, 2015.

Samia Mehrez. Translating Egypt’s Revolution: The Language of Tahrir. Cairo, Egypt: The American University in Cairo Press, 2012.

Samia Mehrez, ed. Arts and the Uprising in Egypt: the Making of a Culture of

Ahdaf Soueif. Cairo: My City, Our Revolution. London: Bloomsbury Publishing, 2012.

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Trump’s Racism

Progress is indicated when ABC cancelled the reboot of Rosanne Bar’s TV sitcom after she tweeted racist statements in May 2018 and a black woman won the Democratic nomination for Governor of Georgia. But, opposing the trend of denouncing racism, President Trump referred to Central American refugees as animals, painted Hispanics as violent gang members, and called some black African countries and Haiti “shithole” countries. He suggested that perhaps (mostly black) athletes who kneel during the national anthem to protest police violence should be deported. He wanted more immigrants from countries like Norway. He said some white nationalists at a Charlottesville, Virginia, demonstration held in August of 2017 were “some very fine people” and refused to condemn them for violence and Nazi insignia. He reminded his Millennial advisors Jared Kushner and Stephen Miller how much crowds at his rallies roar when he talks about throwing Hispanic criminals out of the country.[i] The two men laughed supportively.

[i] Bob Fredericks, “Trump Made Up Hispanic Names While Prepping Anti-Immigrant Speech to Congress,” New York Post, May 25, 2018.

https://nypost.com/2018/05/25/trump-made-up-hispanic-names-while-prepping-anti-immigrant-speech-to-congress/

How Global Youth Values Will Change Our Future

New book by Gayle Kimball:
How Global Youth Values Will Change Our Future
Please ask your library to order from Cambridge Scholars in the UK.
Chapter 1: A Global Generation
Youth Characteristics; Academic Ageism; Get to Know Eva, Abel, Sahar and Yuan; Glocal Hybrid Youth Culture; Global Media Influence, Global Tends Shaping Our Future; How Youth Will Change the Future
 
Chapter 2 Generation Gap
Teenaging of Culture vs. War on Kids; Academics’ Viewpoint; A Current Generation Gap? Helicopter Parents Push School Success; What Youths Think About Adults
 
Chapter 3 Traditional Values
Critics of Modern Values and Stress; Traditional Rural vs. Modern Urban Values; Conflicting Values; Respect for Elders; Traditional Values in First Generation Immigrant Youth; Youth More Family-Focused
 
Chapter 4 Modern Values
Morally Lax and Relativistic?; Cultural Developmental Stages Change Values; Individualism vs. Collective Values; Modern Cultural Creatives; Values in Traditional Muslim Countries; Youth Value Education, Service and Career But Are Anxious
 
Chapter 5 Religious Beliefs
Religious Beliefs; Questions About God; Life Purpose; Meaning of Suffering; Youth Participation in Organized Religions: Comments about Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Taoism, Islam, Judaism and Animism; Spirituality

Regional Difference in Spiritual Attitudes of SpeakOut Youth

Some regional differences surface in SpeakOut respondents’ statements about their life purposes. Rural Chinese youth value service to the motherland and to family: Asian students value getting into a good university: Muslim students value following the principles of their religion and spreading it to others: and African youth place high value on their religion and on having children. Mother of George (2013) portrays this African emphasis on giving birth. The film is about Nigerians living in New York City and the problems created when, a year and a half into marriage, the bride has not gotten pregnant. Reginald, a young Nigerian who gathered book responses for me, explained in an email,

Africans are the most religious, with 67% seeking their purpose in God/Allah, followed by Central and South America (47%) and the Middle East (46%). Western respondents are least likely to know their life purpose—56% in Western Europe and Australia and 20% in North America don’t know. The most altruistic, concerning with doing good deeds, are in India (71%), North America (59%), Eastern Europe (57%), and Central Asia (53%). The most altruistic with a focus on helping family are East Asia (36%), Central Asia (17%), and India (12%). The least altruistic in that they responded to the first question about what you would ask the wisest person by asking about their personal success are Central and South America (37%), followed by 35% in Africa, and 34% in Central Asia and India (gender differences aren’t significant). The most desirous of knowing the meaning of life are in Eastern Europe and Russia (42%), Western Europe and Australia (38%), and North America (37%). Interest in what happens after death is highest in Africa (27%) and Western Europe (19%). Regional differences are more significant than gender or age group.

 

More Muslim Women Clerics

http://theconversation.com/how-a-growing-number-of-muslim-women-clerics-are-challenging-traditional-narratives-77932?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20June%2010%202017%20-%2075995937&utm_content=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20June%2010%202017%20-%2075995937+CID_06ababd3f1a84d5559b4b54706018557&utm_source=campaign_monitor_us&utm_term=How%20a%20growing%20number%20of%20Muslim%20women%20clerics%20are%20challenging%20traditional%20narratives

Acts of Kindness suggested by 6 and 7 year olds

Acts of Kindness suggested by 6- and 7-year-old first graders at Chico Country Day school in California, published as illustrated kindness cards. I organized their suggestions by theme.

Family

Leave secret happy notes for your family for them to find around the house. Make breakfast in bed for your parents. Empty the dishwasher to giver your mom a break. Wait if your mom is talking: Be Patient. Help your dad and mom make a meal for your family to show you care about your family. Do your chores to make your mom and dad happy. Clean the bathroom. Help your parents with chores. Clean your room to help your parents out. Take care of your siblings. Play nice with your brothers and sisters. Read a book to a family member or friend.

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Neighborhood

Bring in a neighbor’s trash can or help weed their yard or pick up dog poop. Get a friend and organize a neighborhood cleanup. Clean up garbage in your neighborhood. Put on gloves and get dirty. Help a neighbor in their garden.

 

School

Organize an all-school clean. Donate balls and hula-hoops to the school. Pick up trash at your school

 

Environment

Turn off the lights when you’re not using them. It is kind for the earth. Make a compost pile. Use containers that can be used again in your lunchbox. . Buy recycled materials like clothing. Grow an organic garden to grow healthy food. Start a community garden. Plant a tree to help the earth.

 

The poor, sick and elders

Make a card for a person in a retirement home or visit and sing them songs. Send a card to your grandma. Send postcards to children in the hospital.

Make lemonade stand and donate the money to help people buy food. Collect socks for the homeless.

Donate old toys to children who don’t have any. Donate money to those in need.

Donate canned food to a homeless shelter.

 

Animals

Collect pet supplies for the Humane Society. Rescue a pet from a shelter. Make a bird feeder. Take your dog for a walk. Play with your dog.

 

Random acts of kindness

Bake cookies for someone. Smile. Write a poem for someone. Or draw a picture. Give someone flowers. Say please and thank you.

Hold a door open for someone.

Donate clothes that are too small for you. Donate books to the library

Help someone learn something new. Share your expertise.

Volunteer.

Give our compliments to your friends.