Category Archives: Beliefs

Regional Difference in Spiritual Attitudes of SpeakOut Youth

Some regional differences surface in SpeakOut respondents’ statements about their life purposes. Rural Chinese youth value service to the motherland and to family: Asian students value getting into a good university: Muslim students value following the principles of their religion and spreading it to others: and African youth place high value on their religion and on having children. Mother of George (2013) portrays this African emphasis on giving birth. The film is about Nigerians living in New York City and the problems created when, a year and a half into marriage, the bride has not gotten pregnant. Reginald, a young Nigerian who gathered book responses for me, explained in an email,

Africans are the most religious, with 67% seeking their purpose in God/Allah, followed by Central and South America (47%) and the Middle East (46%). Western respondents are least likely to know their life purpose—56% in Western Europe and Australia and 20% in North America don’t know. The most altruistic, concerning with doing good deeds, are in India (71%), North America (59%), Eastern Europe (57%), and Central Asia (53%). The most altruistic with a focus on helping family are East Asia (36%), Central Asia (17%), and India (12%). The least altruistic in that they responded to the first question about what you would ask the wisest person by asking about their personal success are Central and South America (37%), followed by 35% in Africa, and 34% in Central Asia and India (gender differences aren’t significant). The most desirous of knowing the meaning of life are in Eastern Europe and Russia (42%), Western Europe and Australia (38%), and North America (37%). Interest in what happens after death is highest in Africa (27%) and Western Europe (19%). Regional differences are more significant than gender or age group.

 

Advertisements

More Muslim Women Clerics

http://theconversation.com/how-a-growing-number-of-muslim-women-clerics-are-challenging-traditional-narratives-77932?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20June%2010%202017%20-%2075995937&utm_content=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20June%2010%202017%20-%2075995937+CID_06ababd3f1a84d5559b4b54706018557&utm_source=campaign_monitor_us&utm_term=How%20a%20growing%20number%20of%20Muslim%20women%20clerics%20are%20challenging%20traditional%20narratives

Acts of Kindness suggested by 6 and 7 year olds

Acts of Kindness suggested by 6- and 7-year-old first graders at Chico Country Day school in California, published as illustrated kindness cards. I organized their suggestions by theme.

Family

Leave secret happy notes for your family for them to find around the house. Make breakfast in bed for your parents. Empty the dishwasher to giver your mom a break. Wait if your mom is talking: Be Patient. Help your dad and mom make a meal for your family to show you care about your family. Do your chores to make your mom and dad happy. Clean the bathroom. Help your parents with chores. Clean your room to help your parents out. Take care of your siblings. Play nice with your brothers and sisters. Read a book to a family member or friend.

.

Neighborhood

Bring in a neighbor’s trash can or help weed their yard or pick up dog poop. Get a friend and organize a neighborhood cleanup. Clean up garbage in your neighborhood. Put on gloves and get dirty. Help a neighbor in their garden.

 

School

Organize an all-school clean. Donate balls and hula-hoops to the school. Pick up trash at your school

 

Environment

Turn off the lights when you’re not using them. It is kind for the earth. Make a compost pile. Use containers that can be used again in your lunchbox. . Buy recycled materials like clothing. Grow an organic garden to grow healthy food. Start a community garden. Plant a tree to help the earth.

 

The poor, sick and elders

Make a card for a person in a retirement home or visit and sing them songs. Send a card to your grandma. Send postcards to children in the hospital.

Make lemonade stand and donate the money to help people buy food. Collect socks for the homeless.

Donate old toys to children who don’t have any. Donate money to those in need.

Donate canned food to a homeless shelter.

 

Animals

Collect pet supplies for the Humane Society. Rescue a pet from a shelter. Make a bird feeder. Take your dog for a walk. Play with your dog.

 

Random acts of kindness

Bake cookies for someone. Smile. Write a poem for someone. Or draw a picture. Give someone flowers. Say please and thank you.

Hold a door open for someone.

Donate clothes that are too small for you. Donate books to the library

Help someone learn something new. Share your expertise.

Volunteer.

Give our compliments to your friends.

 

Plse critique book ms. on how global youth values will change our future

I invite you to critique and add your observations to chapters of interest.

 Global Youth Values Will Transform Our Future

Gayle Kimball, Ph.D.

Over 4,000 young people from 88 countries SpeakOut! Future leaders reveal trends in youth culture. Discover the values and religious beliefs of Generations Y and Z, based on their own voices rather than adult projections from multiple-choice surveys. The book includes futurists’ projections of significant trends. Please email for chapters to gkimball at csuchico dot edu

Chapter 1: A Global Generation

Get to Know Eva, Abel, Sahar and Yuan; Global Youth Worldview; Trends Shaping Our Futur

Chapter 2 Generation Gap

Teenaging of Culture vs. War on Kids; Generation Gap; Generation We or Me?; Helicopter Parents Want School Success; What Youth Think About Adult

Chapter 3 Modern Values

Morally Lax?; Modern Cultural Creatives; Generational Differences in Values; Individualism vs. Collective Values; Respect for Elders is a Common Value but is Diminishing; Burdened Youth Value Education, Service and Career

Chapter 4 Traditional Values

Critics of Modern Values and Stress; Traditional Rural vs. Modern Urban Values; Traditional Values in First Generation Immigrant Youth; Youth Are Becoming More Family-Focused

Chapter 5 Religious Beliefs

Religious Beliefs; Participation in Organized Religions

 

Rural Millennials are More Supportive of Trump

https://theconversation.com/study-60-percent-of-rural-millennials-lack-access-to-a-political-life-74513?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Time%20to%20revisit%20school%20locker%20room%20design&utm_content=Time%20to%20revisit%20school%20locker%20room%20design+CID_6d0c42deaf3b36eab5cd546d8dd71d7e&utm_source=campaign_monitor_us&utm_term=Study%2060%20percent%20of%20rural%20millennials%20lack%20access%20to%20a%20political%20life

US Millennials Values

By 2020 more than one-third of voting age people will be Millennials. They tend to be liberal but 26% weren’t registered to vote and 32% didn’t vote in 2012, according to a 2014 national online interviews with 2,004 Millennials, ages 18 to 31 (56% white).[i] Only 8% were conservatives and 13% were cynics–the least likely to vote, while 44% felt closer to the Democrats (63% said they voted for Obama in 2012), 26% felt closer to the Republicans, and 19% said they had no party affiliation. The issues most important to them were making college more affordable, economic opportunity and background checks for gun sales. They believed government should be involved in solving these kinds of problems. Despite the legacy of the Recession of 2008, 70% were optimistic about their economic prospects for the next few years although what they worry about most is finding a good job. Only 39% thought they would be better off than their parents and 60% talk to their parents at least once a day. Most (87%) agreed, “It’s up to me if I succeed or fail.” The values they considered most important for the US were quality, opportunity, and personality responsibility. At the bottom of their values list were competition (7%) and patriotism (8%). Most of them (79%) thought young people have the power to change things although they agreed, “The system is rigged in favor of the rich” (71%). The survey researchers concluded that digital native Millennials (born 1981 to 2004) are “collaborative, tolerant, with high expectations.”

[i] “Understanding Millennials: Nationwide Survey,” Harstad Strategic Research, April 2014.

https://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50742/images/Harstad.Millennial_May15.pdf