Category Archives: Education

Campus Rape Too Common

About one in four college women suffer sexual assault or rape, although they may not consider date rape worthy of being reported to campus authorities. This was discussed in I Never Called It Rape (1987) by Robin Warshaw. Sexual harassment is even greater for women graduate students. The Association of American Universities survey of 27 colleges found that 23% of women had experienced unwanted sexual contact accompanied by physical force or the threat of it during their years in university (5% of men reported this), including 31% of the women of the Harvard class of 2015.[i] In an extensive study of American Hookup: the New Culture of Sex on Campus (2017), Lisa Wade found that male athletes have high status on campus and “In the culture of sex that dominates college campuses today, status is what sex is all about.” Scoring with a high status person gives status points. On the other hand, if sexual assault occurs, it’s difficult to confront a high-status athlete or fraternity member, so 80% of such assaults aren’t reported.

[i] Michele Richinick, “1 in 4 Women Experienced Sexual Assault While in College,” Newsweek, September 22, 2015.

http://readersupportednews.org/news-section2/318-66/32542-1-in-4-women-experienced-sexual-assault-while-in-college-survey-finds

Ageism in Youth Studies: Generation Maligned on sale

Ageism in Youth Studies: Generation Maligned

Ageism is prevalent in a great deal of current scholarship in the social sciences as scholars fault youth for being delinquent or politically apathetic. Researchers ignore young people’s actual voices, despite their leadership in recent global uprisings, some of which unseated entrenched dictators. Neoliberalism must be exposed in its focus on youth sub-cultures and styles rather than economic barriers caused by growing inequality and rising youth unemployment rates. Ageism in Youth Studies also discusses the debate about “Generation We or Me” and if Millennials are narcissistic. Resources about global youth studies are included, along with the results of the author’s surveys and interviews with over 4,000 young people from 88 countries.

Hardback

ISBN-13:978-1-4438-7310-9
ISBN-10:1-4438-7310-1
Date of Publication:01/05/2017
Pages / Size:235 / A5
Old Price:£61.99
Price:£29.99

Brave flyer

 

Brave: The Global Women’s Revolution

Gayle Kimball, Ph.D.

Textbook for Global Feminisms and Intro to WSt

Ebook $10 and print paperback on demand

Contact Equality Press gkimball@csuchico.edu for exam copy

Chapters on seven regions, the future is female, global desire for equality, global status of women, consumerism, and global media.

https://globalyouthbook.wordpress.com/

The cover photo is a poster in Tahrir Square, taken by the author July 2011. The protesters’ tents are in the background.

 

Introduction 25

Part 1 Themes

Chapter 1 The Future is Female 67 pages

Meet Young Women Leaders; What Motivates a Youth Activist?; the Future is Female?; Uppity Girls’ Rising Aspirations and Activism; Feminism, the United Nations and Governments Stimulate Equality; Young Men’s Viewpoints

 

Chapter 2 Global Desire for Equality 55

Equality is Desired Globally, More Females Desire Gender Equality, Girls Want Economic and Social Equality, Claims that Women Leaders are More Peaceful, Feminist Organizing, Inequality Persists in All Countries

 

Chapter 3 Global Status of Young Women 55

Rural Vs. Urban Sex Roles, Feminization of Poverty, Education, Health, Violence

 

Chapter 4 Consumerism Targets “Girl Power” 44

Materialistic Consumers of Products and Entertainment?; Teen Identity Through Consumption; Social Unrest from Rising Expectations; How Youth Are Manipulated by Multinational Corporations; Negative Consequences of Consumerism; Youth Views about Getting Rich; Traditional and Modern Beliefs: Moving Towards the Middle

 

Chapter 5 Global Media Both Helps and Inhibits Girls 60

Global Media is Pervasive, Global Media Provides New Information, Media Exposure Makes Youth Opinionated and Brave, Global Media Sells Consumerism, Media Addiction Creates Dumb Zombies

 

Part 2 Regions

Chapter 6 Feminist Waves in the West 97

Second Wave Feminists of the 60s, Women’s Studies, Inequality Persists, Generation Gap, Third Wave Response, Rejection of Feminism?, Fourth Wave

 

Chapter 7 Brave Women in Muslim Countries 61

The Middle East, Women and Islam, Iran, Tunisia, Yemen, Libya, Morocco, Turkey, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia

 

Chapter 8 Egyptian Revolutionaries 44

Traditional Male Dominance; Education; A Pioneering Feminist: Dr. Nawal El Saadawi’s Egyptian Union for Women; Young Women in the Revolution; After the Revolution; Sexual Harassment Persists

 

Chapter 9 Women in Developing and Emerging Countries: Latin America 59

Women and Development, Latin American Youth Issues

 

Chapter 10 African Issues and Activists 44,

 

Chapter 11 Socialist Countries–China 44

The Setting, Traditional Beliefs, Rural vs. Urban Youth, Youth Issues in an Era of Change from Maoism to Capitalism, Current Chinese Issues

 

Chapter 12 Russia 28

History, Attitudes Towards Feminism, Consumerism and Glamour, Putin’s Nationalism vs. Rebels

 

Other Books by the Author

50/50 Marriage (Beacon Press)

50/50 Parenting (Lexington Books)

Ed. Women’s Culture (Scarecrow Press)

Ed. Women’s Culture Revisited. (Scarecrow Press, 2005)

The Religious Ideas of Harriet Beecher Stowe. Edwin Mellen Press.

Essential Energy Tools book and 3 videos. (Equality Press)

21st Century Families: Blueprints for Family-Friendly Workplaces,

Schools and Governments. (Equality Press)

The Teen Trip: The Complete Resource Guide (Equality Press)

Ed. Everything You Need to Know to Succeed After College (Equality

Press)

How to Survive Your Parents’ Divorce (Equality Press)

Ed., Quick Healthy Recipes: Literacy Fundraiser (Equality Press)

Your Mindful Guide to Academic Success: Beat Burnout (Equality Press)

Ageism in Youth Studies: A Maligned Generation (Cambridge Scholars Publishing)

 

In Process

Democracy Uprisings Led by Global Youth

Tactics and Goals for Changemaking

Recent Feminism in India

 

Decreases in US College Diversity

Overall increases in tuition and state universities accepting more out-of-state and foreign students who pay higher tuition has led to decline in low-income students in top public colleges.[i] The problem is caused by state spending on higher education that decreased by 18% since 2008, according to the Center of Budget and Policy Priorities. The College Access Index keeps track of student income; it found that the average percentage of first year students who received Pell grants, indicating they come from the bottom half of family income, fell from 24% in 2012 to 22% in 2016. Some colleges also cope by accepting more students, leading to crowding.

[i] David Leonhardt, “The Assault on Colleges—and the American Dream,” New York Times, May 25, 2017.

Acts of Kindness suggested by 6 and 7 year olds

Acts of Kindness suggested by 6- and 7-year-old first graders at Chico Country Day school in California, published as illustrated kindness cards. I organized their suggestions by theme.

Family

Leave secret happy notes for your family for them to find around the house. Make breakfast in bed for your parents. Empty the dishwasher to giver your mom a break. Wait if your mom is talking: Be Patient. Help your dad and mom make a meal for your family to show you care about your family. Do your chores to make your mom and dad happy. Clean the bathroom. Help your parents with chores. Clean your room to help your parents out. Take care of your siblings. Play nice with your brothers and sisters. Read a book to a family member or friend.

.

Neighborhood

Bring in a neighbor’s trash can or help weed their yard or pick up dog poop. Get a friend and organize a neighborhood cleanup. Clean up garbage in your neighborhood. Put on gloves and get dirty. Help a neighbor in their garden.

 

School

Organize an all-school clean. Donate balls and hula-hoops to the school. Pick up trash at your school

 

Environment

Turn off the lights when you’re not using them. It is kind for the earth. Make a compost pile. Use containers that can be used again in your lunchbox. . Buy recycled materials like clothing. Grow an organic garden to grow healthy food. Start a community garden. Plant a tree to help the earth.

 

The poor, sick and elders

Make a card for a person in a retirement home or visit and sing them songs. Send a card to your grandma. Send postcards to children in the hospital.

Make lemonade stand and donate the money to help people buy food. Collect socks for the homeless.

Donate old toys to children who don’t have any. Donate money to those in need.

Donate canned food to a homeless shelter.

 

Animals

Collect pet supplies for the Humane Society. Rescue a pet from a shelter. Make a bird feeder. Take your dog for a walk. Play with your dog.

 

Random acts of kindness

Bake cookies for someone. Smile. Write a poem for someone. Or draw a picture. Give someone flowers. Say please and thank you.

Hold a door open for someone.

Donate clothes that are too small for you. Donate books to the library

Help someone learn something new. Share your expertise.

Volunteer.

Give our compliments to your friends.

 

Ugandan Girls Need Textbooks says 15-Year-old

Teen to Headmaster: Girls Need Their Own Textbooks

By: Moureen Kisakye7 hours ago

From our partner Women In Leadership Uganda

When I was 11 years old, my school days were hard like rocks because even if it rained cats and dogs I had to leave very early for school to be there for 7 a.m. Hunger and canes were my daily friends. We were hit with sticks for many different reasons: for being late, for not wearing the right socks, for dirty uniforms, for not finishing work. When we came late, we were told by our beloved teachers that “latecomers eat bones.” We were also hit for not putting on the proper school uniform at the school campus. Our teachers used to tell us that “You are caned because we want you to improve your academic performance.”

I also had to run barefoot the 20 kilometers (more the 12 miles) to and from school since my parents are poor like church mice and couldn’t afford shoes. This isn’t unusual in Uganda.

The transition into high school  wasn’t easy. I was a boarding student and made sure to sit in front so I could understand what the teacher was teaching, especially during mathematics and physics lessons.

At this level the studies were more complicated but the shortage of textbooks made the situation extreme. Especially for the girls in the class. One day, a mathematics teacher sent students for textbooks. He ordered the student to bring 50 books even though the class had 78 students. Boys were given one book each and girls were given one book on each desk. This meant that we girls had to share one book between four people while the boys read individually. After reading, the boys disturb the girls by taking our books from us. This practice is causing some of the female students to lose interest in their studies.

I don’t want to drop out of school. I want to become a doctor. At school I spend a lot of time on my science classes, including biology, chemistry and physics. But how am I supposed to study and learn and beat the boys in my class if I only get one quarter of a textbook to learn from?

This essay serves as my plea to the directors, headmaster and staff: Please buy more books and distribute them evenly among the students. I can’t help our people who suffer from malaria and diabetes unless you help me learn.

This story is part of Teen Voices at Women’s eNews. In 2013 Women’s eNews retained the 25-year-old magazine Teen Voices to continue and further its mission to improve the world for female teens through media. Teen Voices at Women’s eNews provides online stories and commentary about issues directly affecting female teens around the world, serving as an outlet for young women to share their experiences and views. Learn More.

ABOUT MOUREEN KISAKYE

Moureen Kisakye, 15, is a student at Townside High School in Busembatia, Uganda.

http://womensenews.org/2017/05/teen-to-headmaster-girls-need-their-own-textbooks/

Democracy Uprisings Led by Global Youth, a new book by Gayle Kimball

Democracy Uprisings Led by Global Youth

Gayle Kimball, Ph.D.

Fall 2017 publication

Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Who are Global Youth Activists?

Chapter 2: Recent Youth Revolutions Began in the Middle East

Chapter 3: Egypt’s 18-Day Revolution

Chapter 4: Turkey’s Gezi Park

Chapter 5: The Wave of European Uprisings

Chapter 6: Russia’s White Ribbon Movement

Chapter 7: China Human Rights Vs. The Party

Chapter 8: Prefigurative Movements in Latin America

Chapter 9: Youth Uprisings In North America

Other Books by the Author

50/50 Marriage (Beacon Press)

50/50 Parenting (Lexington Books)

Ed. Women’s Culture (Scarecrow Press)

Ed. Women’s Culture Revisited. (Scarecrow Press, 2005)

The Religious Ideas of Harriet Beecher Stowe. Edwin Mellen Press.

Essential Energy Tools book and 3 videos. (Equality Press)

21st Century Families: Blueprints for Family-Friendly Workplaces,

Schools and Governments. (Equality Press)

The Teen Trip: The Complete Resource Guide (Equality Press)

Ed. Everything You Need to Know to Succeed After College (Equality

Press)

How to Survive Your Parents’ Divorce (Equality Press)

Ed., Quick Healthy Recipes: Literacy Fundraiser (Equality Press)

Your Mindful Guide to Academic Success (Equality Press)

Ageism in Youth Studies: A Maligned Generation (Cambridge Scholars Publishing)

 Global Youth Values Transforming Our Future (Cambridge Scholars Publishing)

Tactics and Goals for Changemaking

Brave: The Global Girls’ Revolution