Category Archives: Education

Your Mindful Guide to Academic Success reviews and contents

The expanded second edition (with a red cover) is now available for $10 on various eBook platforms.

Table of Contents  

Chapter 1 How to Achieve Your Goals with Metacognition

Understanding Your Learning Styles

Making Your Brain Work for You

Coping with Learning Disabilities

Identifying Your Personality Types

 

Chapter 2 Study Skills

Reading, Note Taking, Memorizing, Study Groups

Test Taking Skills suggestions by Dr. Stephen Tchudi

Effective Oral Reports

Overcoming Math Anxiety

Time Management vs. Procrastination

 

Chapter 3 How to do Research by Morgan Brynnan, MLIS

Information Literacy

CRAAP – Evaluating Sources

Research Basics

Plagiarism, Ethics and Citation

 

Chapter 4 Coping with Stress

The Physiology and Causes of Stress

How to Cope with Stress

Resilience

Balance the Left and Right Sides of the Body

 

Chapter 5 Understand Mind Power

Research on Mind Over Matter

Positive Self-Talk

How to Clear Emotional Blocks

 

Chapter 6 Emotional Issues that Impact School Success

The Power of the Unconscious Mind

Happiness

Being a Student of Color in a PWI

Self-Esteem

Worry

Anxiety and Depression

Grief

Anger

 

Chapter 7 Physical Vitality

Healthy Food

Prevent Eyestrain

Exercise

Increase Energy

Enough Sleep

 

Chapter 8 Getting into College, Career Planning

Getting Into College

Adjusting to College

Post-College Career Planning

 

Chapter 9 Student Activism and Education Internationally

What Students Want from their Education

The Finnish Model

Student Educational Activism

Youth Activism in the US

 

Biographies of the students who added their experiences to this book.

 

Endnotes

on March 4, 2017
Gayle Kimball is CSU, Chico Department of Sociology professor emerita. In her writing she blends “energy work” (using acupressure, meditation and visualization “to harness the power of the mind”) with a deep passion for reaching students around the world who are trapped in conditions that make it a challenge to succeed.

Challenges may come from without (poverty, social discrimination) but also from within (procrastination, fear, aimlessness), and in her new book Kimball provides hundreds of resources that help students become overcomers, even activists. She also includes “the advice and experience of young people from various countries to discover how they succeed and to provide insight into the global youth culture….”

The book focuses on cultivating good study skills, developing strategies for taking tests and writing essays, “clearing emotional blocks to success,” using the internet to increase educational access, and joining youth movements around the world to “fight for a more just and equitable world.”

Kimball draws on a wealth of information about, for example, learning disabilities, “balancing the left and right sides of the body,” positive self-talk, depression, being a student of color, and more. (The section on how to research is written by former Butte College librarian Morgan Brynnan.)

Kimball advises students to “structure regular time for exercise, socializing, quiet time, and volunteer work that you feel passionate about so you don’t burn out. I’d also like you to think about the influence of sex-role socialization in your choice of major and career objectives. Try to think outside the typical, the normal. In a world that’s increasingly global and unequal, my other hope is that you’ll be an activist in whatever cause is most important to you.”

Copyright Chico (CA) Enterprise-Record. Used by permission.

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on March 22, 2017
This is an excellent read, simple, interesting and informative. It helps shed light on what global youth is interested in and their education on every level and field. Gayle does a wonderful job illustrating what techniques work best and how young people learn most effectively. Whether you are en educator or simply have children and young adults you care about, this book is a valuable resource. Once again Gayle has offered us practical, relevant wisdom condensed in a book. Education is empowering and births positive transformation. Thank you, Gayle!
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this book is useful for international as well as American students in learning how to study efficiently – the author also teaches best ways to use the brain in learning and stress reduction techniques (many of those are unique) – & I liked the many profiles and quotes form students from various countries who are trying to mange school and grades — if you have a junior HS’er thru college age, I think your student can benefit from this book
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on February 7, 2017
Dr. Kimball’s impressive access to such a diverse pool of students – international and national – ensures that the advice provided in this book caters to all kinds of individuals. Whether you’re an ambitious senior looking to navigate the convoluted admissions process or someone just aiming to update conventional studying techniques, these first-hand tips and experiences, as narrated by current students, will prove most insightful to your own academic encounters ahead.
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on March 8, 2017
The book contains detailed analysis from students belonging to countries around the world and has useful insights into the minds of youngsters and how they should deal with contemporary education systems.
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recent US presidents on sexual assault

Under President Bill Clinton, the State Department created the Office of Global Women’s Issues. President Barack Obama said he was what a feminist looked like and created the White House Council on Women and Girls, because, “From sports leagues to pop culture to politics, our society does not sufficiently value women. We still don’t condemn sexual assault as loudly as we should.”[i] Obama asked parents of young men to teach them respect for women as part of the 2014 campaign “It’s on Us” to prevent campus sexual assaults.[ii] . President Trump can’t say much because many women have accused him of sexual assault, including a list of women who have publically spoken up.[i]

[i] Catherine Pearson, Emma Gray, and Alanna Vagianos, “A Running List of the Women Who’ve Accused Donald Trump of Sexual Assault,” Huffington Post, October 28, 2016.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/a-running-list-of-all-the-women-whove-accused-donald-trump-of-sexual-assault_us_57ffae1fe4b0162c043a7212

[i] Michael Shear and Elena Schneider, “Obama Unveils Push for Young People to Do More Against Campus Assaults,” New York Times, September 19, 2014.

[ii] http://itsonus.org/#pledge

Catherine Pearson, Emma Gray, and Alanna Vagianos, “A Running List of the Women Who’ve Accused Donald Trump of Sexual Assault,” Huffington Post, October 28, 2016.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/a-running-list-of-all-the-women-whove-accused-donald-trump-of-sexual-assault_us_57ffae1fe4b0162c043a7212

Global Survey of 20,000 Gen X Youth

The Varkey Foundation released a study that claims to be the first and largest global survey of Generation Z attitudes in 2017 because there’s “very little in-depth reputable polling on the opinions and attitudes of Generation Z.” It surveyed 20,088 young people ages 15 to 21 from 20 representative countries in 2016. They were part on online research panels, meaning they all had acess to the Internet. Their results reinforced my Global SpeakOut survey findings that youth attitudes are “remarkably similar” globally:  They’re generally happy, comfortable with diversity, value helping others, are not religious, and are most influenced by their parents. Their parents are the main influence on their values (89%)–followed by friends and teachers–and 67% have a good relationship with their parents. Only 30% say celebrities influence their values and less than 17% report being influenced by politicians. Family is their priority for the future, more so than health, career, or money. Only 42% say religion is significant to them (especially in Africa), while 39% say it has no significance to them (especially in Japan, Australasia, and Europe). Instead of religion they value service to others; 67% think that making a wider contribution to society is important, especially if they gain more skills and knowledge.

The Digital Natives have faith that technology (84%) and education (80%) will make the future better, but in 16 out of 20 countries more young people believe the world is becoming worse. Overall, 37% think the world is getting worse, only 20% think it’s getting better, and the rest didn’t pick either possibility. The most pessimistic are in Western developed countries, France and Italy, while emerging countries of China and India have the highest percentage of optimistis about the future. The lack of good education makes 69% of them worry about the future. They’re more concerned about extremism and terrorism (83%) than climate change (66%), except in China. There pessimism is not surprising when they grew up with rapid change, growing inequality, terrorism, the refugee crisis, poor education in many developing nations, the rise of populism, climate change and probably the first generation to that will be worse off than their parents.

Two-thirds (68%) say they’re happy; more so in emerging countries (Indonesia, Nigeria, and India) than in developed countries (France, Australasia and the UK). The older respondents and the young women were less happy than younger and male respondents. The least happy Gen Z respondents live in Japan and South Korea. More than half (60%) think their country is a good place to live. However, over two-thirds lack overall emotional well-being, as measured by they don’t think about their problems too much, they don’t feel anxious, lonely, unloved or bullied. Only 17% think they get enough sleep, exercise, and time for reflection so it’s not surprising that they don’t feel content. Their main sources of anxiety are money and school.

Gen X has liberal viewpoints: Opposing prejudice, 89% believe men and women should be treated equally (especially in Canada and China), 74% believe that transgender people should have rights, 66% believe in safe and legal abortion, 63% believe same-sex marriage should be legal, but only about half believe in free speech if it’s offensive to religion or minority groups. Support for free speech is highest in Turkey and Argentina, countries with a history of authoritarian governments, and lowest in Nigeria and China. Young people in 14 out of the 20 countries are supportive of immigrant rights in their country. Few think a person’s religion is an important factor in selecting a friend. Only 3% think fame is the most important factor in choosing a career.

 

Emma Broadbent, et al., “Generation Z: Global Citizenship Survey,” Varkey Foundation, January 2017.

https://www.varkeyfoundation.org/sites/default/files/Global%20Young%20People%20Report%20%28digital%29%20NEW%20%281%29.pdf

DACA uncertain for undocumented students

“Every year, over 65,000 undocumented students graduate from high schools across the United States. Every year across the United States and its territories, more than 80,000 individuals become eligible for DACA status but are deterred from pursuing these protections due to uncertainty and risk of deportation. Currently, there are at least 10 states calling for an to end DACA.”
The future of the DACA program remains uncertain, considering ICE has previously detained individuals at schools despite the protections.”

What Should Globally Competent Students Learn?

Educating for Global Competence: Preparing Our Youth to Engage in the World teaches that students need to learn how to investigate the world, recognize others’ perspectives, be able to communicate ideas, and know how to take action to improve problems.

 

Veronica Boix Mansilla and Anthony Jackson, “Educating for Global Competence,” Asia Society and Council of Chief State School Officers, 2011.

https://asiasociety.org/files/book-globalcompetence.pdf

Ageism in Youth Studies: Generation Maligned available in affordable paper for Fall

PDFflyer-ageism

Chapter One…………………………………………………………………….. 1

Ageist Scholars Ignore Youth

 

Chapter Two…………………………………………………………………. 42

Generation Maligned

 

Chapter Three………………………………………………………………… 93

The Narcissism Debate

 

Chapter Four………………………………………………………………… 137

Anxious and Stressed

 

 

Appendicies on survey results, films, Internet resources, large global surveys of youth, academic research, and bibliography.

While researching Generations Y and Z for the past decade for a book series about global youth activism and viewpoints, I discovered a split between scholarly viewpoints about Gen Me vs. Gen We. Some researchers fault youth for being narcissists and others praise them for being altruistic. I was surprised that many scholars who write about youth don’t actually talk to them or include their voices when young people face difficult economic challenges globally, with high youth unemployment rates and increasing tuition costs. It’s easier to blame the victim than the economic system that generates more and more inequality, just as teachers get blamed for structural problems in the education system. Ageism in Youth Studies: Generation Maligned exposes how authors ignore youth, disparage them, and fault them for being anxious, depressed and narcissistic without pressing for change in the economic system that harms them. Youth are the best-educated generation ever, an altruistic group that cares about global problems. They should be viewed as a resource in the present, as they are in Nordic countries, rather than as a source of trouble.

Campus Rape Too Common

About one in four college women suffer sexual assault or rape, although they may not consider date rape worthy of being reported to campus authorities. This was discussed in I Never Called It Rape (1987) by Robin Warshaw. Sexual harassment is even greater for women graduate students. The Association of American Universities survey of 27 colleges found that 23% of women had experienced unwanted sexual contact accompanied by physical force or the threat of it during their years in university (5% of men reported this), including 31% of the women of the Harvard class of 2015.[i] In an extensive study of American Hookup: the New Culture of Sex on Campus (2017), Lisa Wade found that male athletes have high status on campus and “In the culture of sex that dominates college campuses today, status is what sex is all about.” Scoring with a high status person gives status points. On the other hand, if sexual assault occurs, it’s difficult to confront a high-status athlete or fraternity member, so 80% of such assaults aren’t reported.

[i] Michele Richinick, “1 in 4 Women Experienced Sexual Assault While in College,” Newsweek, September 22, 2015.

http://readersupportednews.org/news-section2/318-66/32542-1-in-4-women-experienced-sexual-assault-while-in-college-survey-finds