Category Archives: Global Problems

Young Indian Changemakers

Youth Ki Awaaz is proud to collaborate with The United Nations Volunteers (UNV) programme to bring to you powerful video stories of 10 such young people from across India – through our short documentary series, #Restless4Change.

These are inspiring stories of determination that represent the idea that we can all create a positive impact on the world.

Over the course of the next week, we will be sharing with you two such inspiring stories a day – and trust me, they will give you hope that it’s possible to create a better tomorrow.

Check out the video stories here, and let me know what you think about them.

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Recent Indian Feminism

In her book New Feminisms in South Asian Social Media, Film, and Literature (2017 written with Sonora Jha), Professor Alka Kurian listed recent feminist actions, which she sees as a “radically new kind of feminist politics” inspired by the concept of rights and the tactics of youth-led protests since the Arab Spring of 2011. Mainstream feminism hadn’t focused on sexual harassment (called Eve-teasing), but rather child marriage, abortion of girls, and dowry violence (such as brides burned to death in supposedly accidental kitchen fires). Kurian traces the contemporary willingness to address this issue to the arrival of Western media and increase in the number of independent women professionals during economic liberalization in the 1990s and the resulting backlash from conservatives–including increase in violence against women. Like other recent social movements, there’s emphasis on intersectional issues including caste (rights for Dalits) and religion (equality for Muslims). Kurian sees the concern for the rights of minorities as the Fourth Wave of Indian feminism. She gives examples of recent campaigns that generate increasing support:

 

2003: Blank Noise Project against Eve-teasing

2009: Pink Chaddi (panties) movement

2011: SlutWalks

2011: Why Loiter Project on women’s right to public spaces

2012: The gang rape of Delhi student incited huge protests and new legislation with harsher punishment of rapists.

2015: Pinjra Tod (Break the Cage) movement against curfews for women in student dorms

2017: Bekhauf Azadi (Freedom Without Fear) March

2017: #MeToo led by younger actresses about Bollywood abuse.

Recent Feminism in India by Alka Kurian

https://theconversation.com/metoo-is-riding-a-new-wave-of-feminism-in-india-89842?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20February%201%202018%20-%2093758012&utm_content=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20February%201%202018%20-%2093758012+CID_560a2d79abaa6c1c08f7e933e33ac961&utm_source=campaign_monitor_us&utm_term=MeToo%20is%20riding%20a%20new%20wave%20of%20feminism%20in%20India

#MeToo Around the World

Women around the world joined #MeToo in to post their stories on social media, including in Egypt, Lebanon, Pakistan and India. French women called their campaign “Expose Your Pig” (#BalanceTonPorc). It became more controversial when actress Catherine Deneuve and 100 other women published a letter in January of 2018 criticizing the movement for being too Puritan and a witch hunt while supporting male flirting and gallantry. Chinese feminist “silence breakers” who tried to organize their own #MeToo movement with petitions demanding investigation into sexual harassment and Internet logos of fists with painted nails were blocked by government censors who deleted petitions and blocked social media use of phrases like “anti-sexual harassment” or “#MeTooChina. They also demanded more women in high office. “We are angry and shocked,” declared activist Zhang Leilei, age 24.[i] Journalist Sophia Huang Xueqin, 30, created a social media platform to report sexual harassment, observing, “We’re not brave enough to stand out as one individual. But together, we can be strong.” One brave individual, Luo Xixi posted an online essay read by more than three million people, describing sexual harassment by her professor at Beihang University. She moved to the US.

Muslim women started #DearSister to express their voices. In Pakistan, the controversial film Verna (2017) tells the story of a teacher who is abducted and raped by the son of a governor. The Central Board of Film Censors banned the film for “maligning state institutions,” but an appellate board lifted the ban due to the #UnbanVerna campaign.

[i] Javier Hernandez and Zoe Mou, “’Me Too,’ Chinese Women Say,” New York Times, January 23, 2018.

Half of US college students lack food security

About half of all US college students lack food security, with students of color, first generation students, former foster youth, and LGBT students most at risk.[i]

[i] “Hunger on Campus,” National Student Campaign Against Hunger and Homelessness, October 2016.

https://studentsagainsthunger.org/hunger-on-campus/

Turkish girls can marry at 9?

“Turkey’s directorate of religious affairs has declared that Islamic law allows girls to marry at age 9, prompting outrage on social media and calls for a parliamentary inquiry from the country’s main opposition party. The Diyanet, a government body that employs all of the country’s imams, provides Quranic training for children, and drafts weekly sermons that are delivered at the country’s 85,000 mosques, had issued a statement on its website claiming that Islamic law dictates that adolescence begins for girls at age 9 — and that girls who had reached the age of adolescence had the right to marry.

The Diyanet has claimed that its intention was merely to define a contentious point of Islamic law and that the declaration would not change the country’s minimum age of marriage — typically 17 years of age, although exceptions can be granted for those who are age 16. Secular critics, however, have suggested that the move is clearly intended to encourage child marriage by pointing to the widespread use of unofficial religious weddings that often involve underage participants, the recent passage of a law that allows Muslim clerics to conduct civil marriages, and the grim reality that an estimated third of all legal marriages in the country already involve girls under the age of 18.”

https://nytlive.nytimes.com/womenintheworld/2018/01/04/religious-arm-of-turkeys-government-sparks-outrage-by-declaring-girls-as-young-as-9-fit-to-marry/