Category Archives: Global Youth Activism

French Feminist Poster Paris v. Domestic Abuse

By Constant Méheut

Feminists Paper Paris With Stark Posters Decrying Domestic Abuse

A widespread but illegal campaign by a group calling itself “the Gluers” uses posters to denounce violence against women. It has become an effective — and ubiquitous — tool to raise awareness.

PARIS — On a recent mild night, a squad of four young women wandered through a peaceful neighborhood in eastern Paris, armed with a bucket of glue, a paintbrush and backpacks loaded with posters.

22 year old leads Balarus democracy uprising

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/04/world/europe/belarus-blogger-poland-svetlov.html?

  • 4, 2020

WARSAW — Stepan Svetlov’s computer sits on a desk in Warsaw, nearly 300 miles from Minsk, the capital of Belarus. But when Belarusians poured into the streets in the hours and days after President Aleksandr G. Lukashenko fraudulently claimed a re-election victory on Aug. 9, it was thanks in no small part to Mr. Svetlov, 22, and his computer.

Internet access was often blocked that week, leading opposition activists were in custody or in hiding, and independent media has long been heavily restricted in Belarus. But Belarusians were kept informed and even directed by an account run by Mr. Svetlov on one of the few social media platforms — Telegram — that had managed to maintain sporadic service during the internet outage.

From across the border, Mr. Svetlov and his team of five pumped out information about voter fraud and police violence — as well as tips about where, when and how to protest, evade the police, defend against police beatings, treat exposure to tear gas and locate medicine and safe houses.

“Take to the streets,” Mr. Svetlov and his team wrote after preliminary results were announced on Aug. 9, “and defend your votes!”

Extinction Rebellion Ocean Rebellion

https://www.commondreams.org/news/2020/08/21/extinction-rebellion-activists-launch-ocean-focused-offshoot-direct-actions?

A new grassroots climate movement called Ocean Rebellion officially launched this week with non-violent direct actions targeting a luxury cruise liner docked at the United Kingdom’s Falmouth Harbor as part of a broader effort to raise awareness of the environmental impact of cruise shipping.

As the “sea-faring sister” of Extinction Rebellion (XR), Ocean Rebellion “has at its heart a commitment to engage with global high seas stakeholders, so as to address cascading collapses in biodiversity due to overfishing, human-caused climate change, deep sea mining, and other marine emergencies.”

The marine-focused movement, also called OR, detailed its members’ three key demands in a statement Wednesday:

  • Tell the truth: About the destruction of the oceans.
  • Act now: By 2025, reverse drivers of ocean warming, acidification, sea-level rise, and biodiversity collapse.
  • Take control: United Nations to govern our common oceans heritage for the benefit of humankind, especially Indigenous coastal communities. Not for the benefit of industry or finance.

The group added that “if the U.N. fails in this high purpose then a global citizens’ assembly will convene to assume governance.”

Thunberg etc. call out world leaders for failing to tackle the climate crisis

https://www.commondreams.org/news/2020/08/19/greta-thunberg-and-fellow-activists-decry-political-inaction-climate-crisis-after?

A day before meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, four Fridays for Future leaders published an op-ed in The Guardian on Wednesday calling out world leaders for failing to tackle the planetary crisis despite the past two years of youth-led global protests demanding urgent action to achieve climate and environmental justice.

Greta Thunberg of Sweden, Luisa Neubauer of Germany, and Anuna de Wever van der Heyden and Adélaïde Charlier, both of Belgium, noted that their meeting with Merkel, whose government took over the European Council presidency in July, “will be exactly two years since the first school strike for the climate took place.”

Millions worldwide have joined the movement and taken to the streets to call for ambitious policies, “but over these past two years, the world has also emitted more than 80 gigatonnes of CO2,” the activists write. “We have seen continuous natural disasters taking place across the globe: wildfires, heatwaves, flooding, hurricanes, storms, thawing of permafrost, and collapsing of glaciers and whole ecosystems. Many lives and livelihoods have been lost. And this is only the very beginning.”

Although some world leaders have publicly recognized human-caused global heating as an “existential crisis,” organized summits to pave a sustainable path forward, and issued emergency declarations about the state of the planet, “when it comes to action we are still in a state of denial,” they charge. “The climate and ecological crisis has never once been treated as a crisis.”

…Specifically, the Fridays for Future leaders are calling for “halting all fossil fuel investments and subsidies, divesting from fossil fuels, making ecocide an international crime, designing policies that protect workers and the most vulnerable, safeguarding democracy, and establishing annual, binding carbon budgets based on the best available science.”

Thai students take on the military using pop culture images

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/08/11/world/asia/thailand-student-protest-military.html?

In Thailand, Students Take on the Military (and ‘Death Eaters’)

Thousands of young people, borrowing from Harry Potter and other pop culture touchstones, are calling on the army and its allies to get out of politics.

role of TikTok in protests and media

“TikTok is to Black Lives Matter what Twitter was to the Arab Spring,” said Kareem Rahma, 34, a TikTok creator with nearly 400,000 followers on the app. Mr. Rahma’s TikToks from the Black Lives Matter protests in Minneapolis garnered tens of millions of views. “I saw a lot of youth on the ground TikToking the protests as opposed to livestreaming, tweeting or Instagramming,” he said. “The conversations these kids are having with each other are essential.”

In June, teenage TikTok users claimed responsibility for inflating attendance expectations, leading to rows upon rows of empty seats, for Mr. Trump’s rally in Tulsa, Okla., after thousands of them registered for tickets to the event that they had no plans to redeem.

TikTok users have also waged coordinated campaigns to rate Mr. Trump’s businesses poorly on Google, to spam online surveys aimed at Trump supporters with useless information and to damage the Trump campaign’s e-commerce store by collecting in their shopping baskets items they never intend to buy.

Ellie Zeiler, 16, who has 6.3 million followers on TikTok, said that Mr. Trump’s threat to ban the app may even sway more young people to vote against him. “I think that a lot of people didn’t like Trump before, and this has driven people to not like him even more,” she said.

“For many kids, politics feel very distant,” said Eitan Bernath, 18, who has 1.2 million followers on TikTok. “This might be the first time it hits home for a lot of kids.”

On Sunday, nine TikTok creators with a collective 54 million followers, including Brittany Broski, Hope Schwing and Mitchell Crawford, published an open letter addressed to Mr. Trump on Medium.

“TikTok has enabled the kinds of interactions that could never take place on the likes of Facebook and Instagram,” they wrote. “Our generation has grown up on the internet, but our vision of the internet is going to require more than two gatekeepers. Why not use this as an opportunity to level the playing field?” they urged.

Vanessa Pappas, the general manager of TikTok North America, attempted to quell concerns on Saturday. “We’re not planning on going anywhere,” she said in a statement released on the app.

 

If the app’s potential shutdown or instability around a sudden sale has any silver lining, it’s a flood of new users to smaller platforms. Clash, a new short-form video app founded by Brendon McNerney, a former Vine star, became available on Friday night after the news and shot up the app store rankings on Saturday. Byte and Dubsmash, two other short form video apps, have also begun actively recruiting TikTok stars.

Last Wednesday, Triller, an app that functions similarly to TikTok, announced it had hired the 18-year-old TikTok star Josh Richards as the platform’s chief strategy officer, and successfully wooed Mr. Richards along with two other large TikTok stars, Griffin Johnson, 21, and Noah Beck, 19, to join the platform as investors.

Instagram is also offering TikTok creators deals of hundreds of thousands of dollars to create content on Reels, its new product with similarities, according to The Wall Street Journal.

Perez Hilton, a longtime celebrity news chronicler who has amassed 850,000 followers on TikTok, said he hoped that just the threat of a ban would serve as a note of caution for the young talent on the app. “These influencers on TikTok can’t have all their eggs in one basket,” he said. “You have to be everywhere,” he said, if you want to stay famous.

“You need to hustle,” he said. “A lot of the TikTokers that are just pretty, those are the ones that are really going to struggle. Pretty doesn’t age well and it doesn’t translate. The ones that are willing to work on and off TikTok and other platforms, they’re the ones that will be able to continue to thrive.”

 

Instagram is also offering TikTok creators deals of hundreds of thousands of dollars to create content on Reels, its new product with similarities, according to The Wall Street Journal.

 

 

protest tactics like umbrellas and leaf blowers spread like memes

Why Protest Tactics Spread Like Memes

When items like umbrellas and leaf blowers are subverted into objects of resistance, they become very shareable.

Video

 

The New York Times, Sergio Olmos for The New York TimesCredit

July 31, 2020

By Tracy Ma

With Natalie Shutler

Written by Jonah Engel Bromwich

A video frame captured in Hong Kong in August 2019 shows a group of pro-democracy protesters, smoke pluming toward them, racing to place an orange traffic cone over a tear-gas canister. A video taken nine months later and 7,000 miles away, at a Black Lives Matter protest in Minneapolis, shows another small group using the same maneuver. Two moments, two continents, two cone placers, their postures nearly identical.

Images of protest spread on social media reveal many other matching moments from opposite sides of the world, and they often feature everyday objects wielded ingeniously.

Leaf blowers are used to diffuse clouds of tear gas; hockey sticks and tennis rackets are brandished to bat canisters back toward authorities; high-power laser pointers are used to thwart surveillance cameras; and plywood, boogie boards, umbrellas and more have served as shields to protect protesters from projectiles and create barricades.