Category Archives: global youth book data

Ageism in Youth Studies: Generation Maligned on sale

Ageism in Youth Studies: Generation Maligned

Ageism is prevalent in a great deal of current scholarship in the social sciences as scholars fault youth for being delinquent or politically apathetic. Researchers ignore young people’s actual voices, despite their leadership in recent global uprisings, some of which unseated entrenched dictators. Neoliberalism must be exposed in its focus on youth sub-cultures and styles rather than economic barriers caused by growing inequality and rising youth unemployment rates. Ageism in Youth Studies also discusses the debate about “Generation We or Me” and if Millennials are narcissistic. Resources about global youth studies are included, along with the results of the author’s surveys and interviews with over 4,000 young people from 88 countries.

Hardback

ISBN-13:978-1-4438-7310-9
ISBN-10:1-4438-7310-1
Date of Publication:01/05/2017
Pages / Size:235 / A5
Old Price:£61.99
Price:£29.99

Title for book on how global youth will change our future

How Global Youth Values Will Change Our Future
or
How Global Youth Ideas Will Change Our Future
please let me know which title you like best, or an alternative.

Here’s the TOC:
Chapter 1: A Global Generation
Get to Know Eva, Abel, Sahar and Yuan; Global Youth Worldview; Tends Shaping Our Future

Chapter 2 Generation Gap
Teenaging of Culture vs. War on Kids; Generation Gap; Generation We or Me?; Helicopter Parents Want School Success; What Youths Think About Adults

Chapter 3 Modern Values
Morally Lax?; Modern Cultural Creatives; Generational Differences in Values; Individualism vs. Collective Values; Respect for Elders is a Common Value but is Diminishing; Youth Value Education, Service and Career But Feel Burdened

Chapter 4 Traditional Values
Critics of Modern Values and Stress; Traditional Rural vs. Modern Urban Values; Traditional Values in First Generation Immigrant Youths; Youth Are Becoming More Family-Focused

Chapter 5 Religious Beliefs
Religious Beliefs; Participation in Organized Religions

Ageism: Youth are an Ignored Resource

Ageism: Youth are an Ignored Resource

You’re invited to critique chapters of interest before the book is published.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2017

Gayle Kimball, Ph.D.

       Table of Contents

Introduction

Chapter 1 Ageist Scholars Ignore Youth

Chapter 2: The Maligned Generation

Chapter 3: Anxious and Depressed

Chapter 4: The Narcissism Debate

Appendices: Resources for Global Youth Studies

Appendix 1: Appendix 1 Global Youth SpeakOut Survey Results

Appendix 2 Films About Young People

Appendix 3 Internet Global Youth Resources

Appendix 4 Large Global Surveys of Youth

Appendix 5 Academic Research on Youth

Appendix 6 Books About Global Youth and Youth in the Middle East

 

 

Books and Journals about the Recent Global Uprisings

An online magazine ROAR provides current information but not specifically about youth. The online journal Interface: A Journal For and About Social Movements is one of the few scholarly journals to discuss the recent uprisings. The three British editors began publishing the journal in 2009. An exception is Social Movement Studies published an issue on Occupy in 2012.[i] Looking at all their issues from 2011 on, only one included youth in the title, but it focused on organization rather than young people—“’Young People Took to the Streets and All of the Political Parties Got Old’: the 15 M Movement in Spain” (2011). Other social movement publications are Mobilization in press since 1996 and its blog Mobilizing Ideas.[ii] Current Sociology published an issue on “From Indignation to Occupation” in 2013 reporting on the 2011 uprisings but without focus on youth.[iii]

A scan of the Journal of Youth Studies from 2011 found only 26 titles on youth activism or political attitudes out of 224 articles and 10 of the titles were about youth attitudes towards traditional politics.[iv] Surprisingly, not one article was about the uprisings of 2011 to 2014 discussed in this book. A similar search of the Journal of Adolescence found only one issue on political engagement but not rebellions (June 2012), with no other such articles in other issues.[v]

[i] http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14742837.2012.708923#.Uy-lSq1dV8k

[ii] http://mobilizingideas.wordpress.com/category/essay-dialogues/

[iii] DOI:10.1177/0011392113479748

http://csi.sagepub.com/content/61/4/491.short

[iv] http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/cjys20?open=16&repitition=0#vol_16

Following are the topics and date posted online: Greek youth’s protests in 2008 (January 2011), theories of youth resistance (June 2012), Canadian youth activism for people with disabilities (June 2012), a student occupation of their university in 2010 (November 2012), University of Ottawa students’ political engagement (June 2012), youth involvement in politics in Scotland (June 2012), how to involve young Canadian women in provincial public police development (August 2012), Peruvian youth activism for sexual health (November 2012), Spanish youths’ attitudes towards politics—based on interviews (November 2012), British youth’s political participation (September 2013), Australian girls’ attitudes towards women leaders (January 2013), youth protests in Africa (march 2013), Australian teens political interests (May 2013), young men’s political participation in an English town (September 2013), influences on British youth’s political participation (September 2013), theories of youth agency (September 2013).

Alcina Honwana. Youth and Revolution in Tunisa. Zed Books, 2013.

Ahmed Tohamy Abdelhay. Youth Activism in Egypt: Islamism, Political Protest and Revolution. Library of Modern Middle East Studies, 2014. ($104)

Linda Herrera, editor. Wired Citizenship: Youth Learning and Activism in the Middle East. Routledge, 2014

Jessica Taft. Rebel Girls: Youth Activism and Social Change Across the Americas. New York University Press, 2011.

Maria de los Angeles Torres, Irene Rizzini and Norma Del Rio. Citizens in the Present: Youth Civic Engagement in the Americas. University of Illinois, 2013.

[v] http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/01401971/35/3

 

Five books published from 2012 to 2014 cover the global uprisings but not with analysis of the role of young people: Paul Mason, Why It’s Still Kicking Off Everywhere: The New Global Revolutions; an anthology by Anya Schiffrin and Eamon Kircher-Allen, From Cairo to Wall Street: Voices From the Global Spring including activists in their 20s and 30s; and an Internet ebook by Werner Puschra and Sara Burke, eds., The Future We the People Need: Voices from New Social Movements, also about various ages of activists. They wrote another pertinent book available online, World Protests 2006-2013. The 2014 books are They Can’t Represent us! Reinventing Democracy from Greece to Occupy by Marina Sitrin; Dario Azzellini and Cristina Flesher Fominaya’s Social Movements and Globalization: How Protests, Occupations and Uprisings are Changing the World; and Occupy! A Global Movement (2014), a $150 anthology edited by Jenny Pickerill, et al. I

Numerous books examine the recent Arab Uprisings as listed in the endnote, but most without a focus on youth–not even a chapter title with youth in it.[i] The exceptions are 2012 anthologies featured revolutionary voices of activists in their 20s and 30s: Anya Schiffrin and Eamon Kircher-Allen, From Cairo to Wall Street: Voices From the Global Spring and Maytha Alhassena and Ahmed Shigab-Eldin’s Demanding Dignity: Young Voices From the Front Lines of the Arab Revolutions (2012). These books were followed in 2013 by Youth and the Revolution in Tunisia by Alcinda Honwana, Talking to Arab Youth: Revolution and Counterrevolution in Egypt and Tunisia. In 2014 The New Arabs by Juan Cole was published along with Wired Citizenship: Youth Learning and Activism in the Middle East. Ahmed Tohamy Abdelhay’s Youth Activism in Egypt was published in 2015 ($104).

Arab Dawn: Arab Youth and the Demographic Dividend They Will Bring (2015) by Bessma Momani does feature youth with a positive viewpoint, to counter the prevailing negative view of the Middle East in the West. She thinks the Arab Spring was the beginning of a helpful social and cultural revolution. The youth bulge will lead to a “social and cultural revolution” because young people support democracy, entrepreneurialism—especially young women, and globalism. These attitudes are facilitated by ICT (women write half the blogs) and the growth in university attendance, creating a “hybrid identity.” Momani observes that youth reject the choice of secular versus Islamist as they develop a hybrid of Western and Islamic thought. She predicts that change will be most evident in Saudi Arabia where many young people attend universities abroad.

[i] Ashraf Khalil. Inside the Egyptian Revolution and the Rebirth of a Nation. St. Martin’s Press, 2011.

Marwan Bishara. The Invisible Arab: The Promise and Peril of the Arab Revolutions. Nation Books, 2012.

Bassam Haddad, R. Bsheer and Z Abu-Rish, eds. The Dawn of the Arab Uprisings. Pluto Press, 2012.

Nouehied, Lin & Alex Warren. The Battle for the Arab Spring: Revolution, Counter-revolution and the Making of a New Era. Yale University Press, 2012.

Nasser Weddady and Sohrab Ahmari, eds. Arab Spring Dreams. Palgrave, 2012.

Marc Lynch. The Arab Uprising. Public Affairs, 2012.

Gilbert Achcar. The People Want: A Radical Exploration of the Arab Spring. University of California Press, 2013.

Layla al-Zubaidi and Matthew Cassel, eds. Diaries of an Unfinished Revolution: Voices from Tunis to Damascus. Penguin Books, 2013.

Paul Danahar. The New Middle East: The World After the Arab Spring. Boomsbury Press, 2013.

Alcinda Honwana. Youth and the Revolution in Tunisia. Zed, 2013.

Also see syllabus for course on “The Arab Spring” such as https://pol297thearabspring.wordpress.com/syllabus/

Global Youth Surveys Countries List

Countries

Countries (73) x=visited this country

  1. Afghanistan
  2. Algeria
  3. Argentina
  4. Azerbaijan
  5. Australia
  6. Bangladesh
  7. Belgium
  8. Belize x
  9. Bhutan
  10. Brazil x
  1. Burma/Myanmar
  1. Canada x
  2. Chad
  3. Chile
  4. China x
  5. Colombia
  6. Denmark x
  7. Dominican Republic
  8. Ecuador
  9. Egypt x
  10. El Salvador
  11. Ethiopia
  12. France x
  13. Georgia
  14. Germany x
  15. Greece x
  16. India x
  17. Indonesia x
  18. Iraq
  19. Israel
  20. Italy x
  21. Japan x
  22. Kazakhstan
  23. Kenya
  24. Latvia
  25. Mali
  26. Mexico x
  27. Mozambique
  28. Netherlands x
  29. Nepal
  30. New Zealand
  31. Nicaragua
  32. Nigeria
  33. Northern Ireland
  34. Norway
  35. Oman
  36. Pakistan
  37. Palestine
  38. Paraguay
  39. Philippines
  40. Romania
  41. Russia x
  42. Saudi Arabia
  43. Singapore x
  44. Spain
  45. South Korea x
  46. Suriname
  47. Sweden x
  48. Switzerland x
  49. Syria
  50. Tajikistan
  51. Tanzania x
  52. Thailand x
  53. Trinidad and Tobago
  54. Turkey x
  55. Turkmenistan
  56. Uganda
  57. United States x
  58. United Kingdom x
  59. Ukraine
  60. Uruguay
  61. Uzbekistan
  62. Vietnam
  63. Zambia
  64. Most Populated Countries1 China 1,321,851,888

    2 India 1,129,866,154

    3 United States 301,139,947

    4 Indonesia 234,693,997

    5 Brazil 190,010,647

    6 Pakistan 164,741,924

    7 Bangladesh 150,448,339

    8 Russia 141,377,752

    9 Nigeria 135,031,164

    10 Japan 127,433,494

    U.S. Census Bureau, International Data Base. Data updated 07-16-2007

Represented in the Global Youth Survey Responses with Girls Older/Younger and Boys Older/Younger (ages 12-5 are younger, 13-19 are older)

Total 3838

 

Sub-Saharan Africa 366 Total (196 girls/164 boys)

Burkina Faso 3/0

Chad 0/1

Ethiopia 1/0

Kenya 57/0

Liberia 10/12 and 5/7

Mali 0/1

Mozambique 0/0. 1/0

Nigeria 10/20

Sudan 14/1 and 34/1

Tanzania 51/5 and 55/10

Zambia 3/5 and 6/33

South Africa 10/4 and 6/0

Uganda 0, 1/0

 

East Asia 1044 (668/376)

Burma/Myamar 2/1

China 101/19 and 71/21

Western rural China 176/5 and 103/6

Indonesia 24/7 and 14/9
Philippines 0/1, 1/1

Singapore 3/0 2/2

Malaysia 2/0

Taiwan 13/1

Japan 193/7 and 70/15

South Korea 108/44 and 2/0

Thailand 2/1, 0/1

Vietnam 2/0

 

Indian Subcontinent 344 (201/153)

India 151/12 and 111/2

Bhutan 3/0, 3/0

Pakistan 19/1 and 25/0

Bangladesh 0/0 and 8/0

Nepal 15/1 and 16/0

 

Central Asia 116   (81/55)

Armenia 2/0

Azerbaijan 5/0, 4/0

Uzbekistan 5/0 and 2/0

Afghanistan 8/0 and 17/0

Georgia 4/0 and 3/0

Tajikistan 18/0 and 13/0

Turkmenistan 19/1 and 15/0

Kazakhstan 0/0 and 1/0

 

Canada 82 (57/44)

Alberta 2/0 and 1/2

British Colombia 21/6 and 22/12

Manitoba 3/0

Nova Scotia 1/0 and 1/0

Ontario 1/0

Quebec 14/0 and 14/0

 

Eastern Europe and Russia 99 (67/28)

Russia 16/0 and 5/2

Ukraine 19/0 and 10/0

Romania 20/2 and 9/

Latvia, 3/0

Bulgaria 5/0 and 1/0

Czech Republic 1/0 and 1/3

Serbia 1/0, 2/0

Slovakia 1/0

 

Europe–West and British Commonwealth 310 (193/118)

Australia 19/0 and 12/2

Belgium 0/0 0/1

Denmark 0, 1/0

Finland 0/1

France 5/0 and 20/3

Germany 26/1 and 9/0

Greece 2/1, 0/2

Italy 2230, 3/0

Netherlands 9/0 and 3/0

New Zealand 38/0 and 12/0

Spain 0/4 and 1/0

Sweden 7/1 and 8/0

Switzerland 36/12 and 32/4

United Kingdom 7/1 and 4/0

 

Middle East 116 (54/65)

Algeria 4/0, 1/0

Dubai 1/1

Iraq 0/0 3/0

Israel 13/0 and 13/1

Oman 2/

Saudi Arabia 6/0 and 14/1

Turkey 11/10 and 8/6

Kuwait 0 and 1/0

Palestine 4/0 and 2/0

Syria 1/0 and 11/1

Egypt 1/0 and 3/0

 

Latin America and Caribbean 197 (124/80)

Argentina 0/0, 1/0

Belize 3/14 and 6/15

Bonaire 12/0 and 16/0

Brazil 14/5 and 15/5

Chile 2/0

Costa Rica 0/0 1/0

Colombia 6/19 and 3/33

Dominican Republic 1/0, 1/0

Ecuador 1/0 and 3/5

El Salvador 8/0 and 9/0

Mexico 2/0, 2/0

Nicaragua 7/0 and 4/0

Paraguay 1/0

Suriname 1/0

Trinidad and Tobago 0/0 and 1/0

Uruguay 3/1

 

United States 1142 (698/514)

Western states 350/157; Midwest 20/15; North East 23/4; South 3/35

Alabama 1

California 185/ 83 and 252/97

Connecticut 2/0

Florida 7/0 and 1/1

Georgia 4/0

Hawaii 124/13 and 70/10

Idaho 2/3 and 8/0

Illinois 3/0

Kansas 1

Kentucky 1/23 and 0/23

Louisiana 1/1, 0/2

Maryland 2/

Massachusetts 2/1

Michigan 4/0 and 1/0

Minnesota 5/6 and 1/13

New Mexico 4/6, 9/10

New Jersey 0/3 and 1/0

New York 7/1 and 2/0

North Carolina 9/11 and 0/11

Oregon 1/40 and 0/27

Pennsylvania 4/0

South Carolina 2/0

Texas 1/0 and 1/0

Washington 4/2, 1/0

Wisconsin 1

Vermont 3/0

 

Countries (73) x=visited this country

  1. Afghanistan
  2. Algeria
  3. Argentina
  4. Azerbaijan
  5. Australia
  6. Bangladesh
  7. Belgium
  8. Belize x
  9. Bhutan
  10. Brazil x
  1. Burma/Myanmar
  1. Canada x
  2. Chad
  3. Chile
  4. China x
  5. Colombia
  6. Denmark x
  7. Dominican Republic
  8. Ecuador
  9. Egypt x
  10. El Salvador
  11. Ethiopia
  12. France x
  13. Georgia
  14. Germany x
  15. Greece x
  16. India x
  17. Indonesia x
  18. Iraq
  19. Israel
  20. Italy x
  21. Japan x
  22. Kazakhstan
  23. Kenya
  24. Latvia
  25. Mali
  26. Mexico x
  27. Mozambique
  28. Netherlands x
  29. Nepal
  30. New Zealand
  31. Nicaragua
  32. Nigeria
  33. Northern Ireland
  34. Norway
  35. Oman
  36. Pakistan
  37. Palestine
  38. Paraguay
  39. Philippines
  40. Romania
  41. Russia x
  42. Saudi Arabia
  43. Singapore x
  44. Spain
  45. South Korea x
  46. Suriname
  47. Sweden x
  48. Switzerland x
  49. Syria
  50. Tajikistan
  51. Tanzania x
  52. Thailand x
  53. Trinidad and Tobago
  54. Turkey x
  55. Turkmenistan
  56. Uganda
  57. United States x
  58. United Kingdom x
  59. Ukraine
  60. Uruguay
  61. Uzbekistan
  62. Vietnam
  63. Zambia

 

Most Populated Countries

1 China 1,321,851,888

2 India 1,129,866,154

3 United States 301,139,947

4 Indonesia 234,693,997

5 Brazil 190,010,647

6 Pakistan 164,741,924

7 Bangladesh 150,448,339

8 Russia 141,377,752

9 Nigeria 135,031,164

10 Japan 127,433,494

U.S. Census Bureau, International Data Base. Data updated 07-16-2007