Tag Archives: gun control

March for our Lives Peace Plan

On average, 21 kids and teens are shot everyday in the United States. Generation Lockdown has been taught from an early age to run, hide, fight. I’m hopeful because of the Peace Plan, our bold and comprehensive plan to end gun violence. And all the student activists from around the country who came together for our first annual summit and are organizing their communities. Not to mention the fact that after people around the country spoke out, Walmart stopped selling handguns and ammunition for military-style weapons, leading dozens of other companies to take action as well.

Ariel Hobbs
Board Member, March For Our Lives

June 7 wear orange for gun control

June 7th — marks the fifth National Gun Violence Prevention Day, also recognized as #WearOrange Day. We’re joining the #WearOrange movement with fellow gun violence prevention organizations to honor all those we have lost and continue to push for the change this country needs to keep people like Hadiya safe.
The March For Our Lives was the largest protest against gun violence in history. But youth activists and other organizations began rallying against this epidemic long before we marched in Washington. By joining this movement and taking action together, we can continue to make a lasting impact on our society.

March for Our Lives Billboards in Times Square

For the next two weeks, eight billboard video screens in Times Square will remind people that we’re not just saying enough is enough.

We want change. We’re going to make sure people don’t stop talking about the gun violence epidemic in America. 

 

 

We’ve protested in front of Congress, targeted influencers across the country, developed QR-code t-shirts to register voters, filled Congressional hearing rooms with hundreds of students, and used texts to organize supporters and drive Get Out The Vote efforts (have you joined our We Call B.S. team yet? Text SAVE LIVES to 954-954). And just last month, we went to the U.S. Capitol to send a clear and powerful message to our nation’s leaders: Your Complacency Kills Us. 

Lauren Hogg, March for Our Lives, 4-17-19

Parkland Activists Generate Youth Vote

https://theconversation.com/the-other-2018-midterm-wave-a-historic-10-point-jump-in-turnout-among-young-people-106505?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Danielle%20PS&utm_content=Danielle%20PS+CID_0b4fac3d29aa42b3c6d3836d3e2f938b&utm_source=campaign_monitor_us&utm_term=the%20Parkland%20movement%20played%20a%20role%20in%20getting%20more%20young%20people%20to%20vote%20in%20the%20November%20midterm%20elections

Never Again Gun Control Movement: Summary of “Glimmer of Hope” tactics and goals

In their anthology titled Glimmer of Hope: How Tragedy Sparked a Movement by the Founders of March for Our Lives (2018), 16 leaders of the Never Again movement for gun control described their tactics and goals. All but one are present or recent graduates from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, where 17 people were killed in a school shooting on Valentine’s Day in 2018. Their main focus is on getting young people to register to vote and to actually vote as they think voting is the key to making political change. They toured 22 states in the summer to get out the vote and then concentrated on college campuses. They don’t have faith in existing legislators who they believe are corrupt and in bondage to their large contributors of campaign funding such as the National Rifle Association. They warned “all the politicians out there, if you take money from the NRA, you have chosen death.”[1] They judged the legislators they lobbied in Florida and in Congress to be uninformed, not interested in listening to young people without a lot of money, “almost untouchable,” dismissive, concerned only about getting photo ops to help their next campaign.[2] They tend to view adults in general as failures who created a broken system. They require any adult who assists them to have a youth point person to make sure their message isn’t diluted.

The students are confident that their generation is uniquely positioned to lead revolutionary change because of the information they gain from the Internet plus their skills using social media, which they believe is the key to outreach. Some of them, like Charlie Mirsky, Cameron Kasky, and David Hogg grew up interested in politics, sparked by listen to TV comedians who discuss the news such as Stephen Colbert and John Oliver. Kasky said, “I grew up consuming political media like it was candy,” formerly a “rebel without a cause.” [3] Growing up with superheroes and Harry Potter, Delaney Tarr said they find themselves “wanting to be these powerhouse, these superheroes who come in and just save the day.”[4] Cameron Kasky greeting the millions of people in the march on Washington with “Welcome to the revolution.” He said, “Don’t worry, we’ve got this.” They have “an incredibly powerful tool: an outlet to millions of people all over the world at our fingertips.”[5] Matt Deitsch promised, “The youth will fix this great nation and truly lead us to a more compassionate future. We can only do this together and with love.”[6] They also acknowledge previous youth activists such as the civil rights era Freedom Riders.

Their worldview emphasizes intersectionality, the importance of including diversity, as in their outreach to African American youth activists in Chicago, Washington, DC, etc. They don’t have to go through a third party but can communicate directly with their networks. Jammal Lemy designed “merch” such as T-shirts and hats with a QR (quick response code) barcode to scan to register to vote. He believes that “art is the most effective media to convey messages.”[7] They’re also unique in the youth of activists such as Naomi Wadlin, an eighth grader who led a school walk-out in Alexandria, Virginia, on March 14 or Yolanda Renee King, the granddaughter of Martin Luther King, Jr. who spoke at the Washington, DC march when she was age nine.

Specific tactics they articulated are individuals need a specific task or they won’t do anything and it’s vital to move beyond anger (and fear generated by frequent threats and harassment) to find joy and love in organizing. They think of their core group of 25 activists as a supportive family that helped them build on their grief at the loss of their friends to build a social movement. (Therapy dogs provided at school also helped them cope.) Emotion is important as “This is a movement relying on the persistence and passion of its people.”[8] They often quote Matt Deitch who urges that “leaders create leaders,” typical of recent organizing that is wary of dominant leaders. They emphasize being nonpartisan to shape an inclusive message as negative forces “will try to separate us by demographics…by religion, race, congressional district and class. They will fail. We will come together.”[9]

[1] The founders. Glimmer of Hope. Penguin, 2018, p.. 175

[2] P. 99

[3] P. 6

[4] P. 97

[5] P. 39

[6] P. 208

[7] P. 198

[8] P. 163

[9] P. 152

#NeverAgain gun control activists explain their tactics

David Hogg and Lauren Hogg. #Never Again. Random House, 2018.
What tactics did these Parkland, Florida, savvy and outspoken teenagers use to make so much happen so fast in the gun control movement? David Hogg explained in his #NeverAgain book that they were very disorganized and as teenagers, no one liked being told what to do. If someone had a good idea, they did it, without asking for approval. Individuals focused on what they did well, such as tweeting, giving interviews, or organizing. He said they didn’t have a plan or hire consultants and focus groups, but communicated the way they were used to online. They started by “going to war with the NRA” with tweets suggesting companies end their special deals with the NRA, which gave the students a “bigger stage” of national attention. Gonzales quickly gained more Twitter followers than the NRA. They picked a few clear goals and picked their battles, ignoring trolls but challenging well-known people like Laura Ingraham who criticized his question, “What if our politicians weren’t the bitch of the NRA?” They weren’t respectful of people in authority like Senator Marco Rubio. What Hogg said made them succeed is they “obsessively” stuck to the task of changing the national discussion about gun control, often spending the night at Cameron’s house and waking up with another idea. After the March for Our Lives in Washington, DC, they organized into committees. Hogg said Gonzales is the only “non-type A” person in the group, the “peaceful radiance at the center of all the spinning wheels.” He advises activists to stay loving and “never, ever stop pointing at the naked emperor.”

Road to Change Gun Control by Never Again Students

June 15: March For Our Lives: Road to Change. Starting in a Peace March in Chicago, the students bused to 20 states and 75 cities to “get young people educated, registered, and motivated to vote.” They pointed out that more than four million teens turned 18 in 2018 and Jaclyn Corin said in email, “We know there is no better way to bring about change than voting.” They described their effort as “a youth-led movement on a mission to elect morally-just leaders.” (The simultaneous Poor People’s Campaign also emphasizes the morality issue.) Tactically savvy, they partnered with Rock The Vote, Headcount, NAACP and Mi Familia Vota, They encouraged students to form intersectional activist clubs in their schools based on relationship building. They sponsored a petition that got hundreds of thousands of signatures, created merchandize to buy, and reached out to partner with gun violence prevention organizations.[i] “Price tags” calculated the amount of money that politicians accepted from the NRA, state by state, to be printed out and displayed. The campaign’s specific goals are to create “a searchable database for gun owners; funding the Centers for Disease Control to research gun violence so that reform policies are backed up by data; and banning high-capacity magazines and semi-automatic assault rifles.”

[i] https://marchforourlives.com/sign/

https://marchforourlives.com/local-action/