Tag Archives: young women

Activist Resources

Brave: Young Women’s Global Revolution is available in affordable paper and ebook.

Reviewed By Edith Wairimu for Readers’ Favorite 5 stars

Brave: Young Women’s Global Revolution, Volume 1 by Gayle Kimball provides a platform for thousands of youths, from 88 countries spanning various continents. More than 4000 surveys and hundreds of interviews were conducted. Its focus is on global issues, mostly those pertaining to women on a global scale. We read the real points of view of women on gender equality and how they envisage the future. Gayle Kimball presents the issues that affect young women among different cultures. She also records young people’s take on material wealth, and the positive and negative roles that global media has played in defining the status of women. Statistics which give weight to the material are included in every chapter and topic. Direct quotations of the interviewees’ opinions are also incorporated as well as thought-provoking questions.

It was great to read a book that focuses on a group that has been overlooked by many researchers in the past. Even though the youth are the future and although they make up a vast component of the world’s population today, their voice is yet to be sufficiently recognized. Another great aspect of Brave: Young Women’s Global Revolution, Volume 1 was that Gayle Kimball captured the true voices of women across the world. It was fascinating to read the opinions of these women. Interestingly, most of their statements shared similar sentiments. They believe that it is time: time for the inclusion of women and time for equality. Uniquely designed and expertly presented, Brave: Young Women’s Global Revolution, Volume 1 inspires and champions women forward.

 

A book for first-year students: Your Mindful Guide to Academic Success: Prevent Burnout. Also a $10 ebook.

 

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If you’re interested in women’s culture, two older anthologies I edited are

Ed. Women’s Culture (Scarecrow Press)

Ed. Women’s Culture Revisited. (Scarecrow Press)

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Resist! Goals and Tactics for Changemakers, 400 pages, will be available as a $10 ebook later this month.

Introduction

Part 1: Issues and Goals

Chapter 1: Globalization Issues

 

Chapter 2: Democracy vs. Autocracy

 

Chapter 3: Equal Opportunity vs. Poverty

 

Chapter 4: Change Work

 

Chapter 5: The Bottom Line: Environmentalism

 

Chapter 6: Who are the Changemakers?

 

Part 2: Tactics and Theories

Chapter 7: Activist Tactics

Chapter 8: How to Make a Revolution

 

Chapter 9: Theories about Social Movements and Power 

 

Chapter 10: Communication Techniques to Gain Support

 

 

 

Young Black Women Running for Office

global young women’s activism eBook

Brave: Young Women’s Global Revolution Volume 1 Themes

Gayle Kimball, Ph.D.

400 pages $9.99 eBook available now on Amazon and other platforms.

Vol. 2 about regional activism will follow in a few weeks.

Brave explores young women’s issues and activism globally, based on hundreds of interviews—some videotaped, and over 4,000 surveys from 88 countries. What makes Brave unique is its global rather than regional reach and its rare inclusion of many young women’s voices. The book includes popular cultural references and feminists’ critiques of the economic and political system. Volume 1 is about global issues and Volume 2 is about regional activism. Discussion questions and activities end each of the five chapters. Chapter titles are: The Future is Female, Global Desire for Equality, Global Status of Young Women, Consumerism Targets “Girl Power,” Global Media Both Helps and Inhibits Girls.

Brave flyer

 

Brave: The Global Women’s Revolution

Gayle Kimball, Ph.D.

Textbook for Global Feminisms and Intro to WSt

Ebook $10 and print paperback on demand

Contact Equality Press gkimball@csuchico.edu for exam copy

Chapters on seven regions, the future is female, global desire for equality, global status of women, consumerism, and global media.

https://globalyouthbook.wordpress.com/

The cover photo is a poster in Tahrir Square, taken by the author July 2011. The protesters’ tents are in the background.

 

Introduction 25

Part 1 Themes

Chapter 1 The Future is Female 67 pages

Meet Young Women Leaders; What Motivates a Youth Activist?; the Future is Female?; Uppity Girls’ Rising Aspirations and Activism; Feminism, the United Nations and Governments Stimulate Equality; Young Men’s Viewpoints

 

Chapter 2 Global Desire for Equality 55

Equality is Desired Globally, More Females Desire Gender Equality, Girls Want Economic and Social Equality, Claims that Women Leaders are More Peaceful, Feminist Organizing, Inequality Persists in All Countries

 

Chapter 3 Global Status of Young Women 55

Rural Vs. Urban Sex Roles, Feminization of Poverty, Education, Health, Violence

 

Chapter 4 Consumerism Targets “Girl Power” 44

Materialistic Consumers of Products and Entertainment?; Teen Identity Through Consumption; Social Unrest from Rising Expectations; How Youth Are Manipulated by Multinational Corporations; Negative Consequences of Consumerism; Youth Views about Getting Rich; Traditional and Modern Beliefs: Moving Towards the Middle

 

Chapter 5 Global Media Both Helps and Inhibits Girls 60

Global Media is Pervasive, Global Media Provides New Information, Media Exposure Makes Youth Opinionated and Brave, Global Media Sells Consumerism, Media Addiction Creates Dumb Zombies

 

Part 2 Regions

Chapter 6 Feminist Waves in the West 97

Second Wave Feminists of the 60s, Women’s Studies, Inequality Persists, Generation Gap, Third Wave Response, Rejection of Feminism?, Fourth Wave

 

Chapter 7 Brave Women in Muslim Countries 61

The Middle East, Women and Islam, Iran, Tunisia, Yemen, Libya, Morocco, Turkey, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia

 

Chapter 8 Egyptian Revolutionaries 44

Traditional Male Dominance; Education; A Pioneering Feminist: Dr. Nawal El Saadawi’s Egyptian Union for Women; Young Women in the Revolution; After the Revolution; Sexual Harassment Persists

 

Chapter 9 Women in Developing and Emerging Countries: Latin America 59

Women and Development, Latin American Youth Issues

 

Chapter 10 African Issues and Activists 44,

 

Chapter 11 Socialist Countries–China 44

The Setting, Traditional Beliefs, Rural vs. Urban Youth, Youth Issues in an Era of Change from Maoism to Capitalism, Current Chinese Issues

 

Chapter 12 Russia 28

History, Attitudes Towards Feminism, Consumerism and Glamour, Putin’s Nationalism vs. Rebels

 

Other Books by the Author

50/50 Marriage (Beacon Press)

50/50 Parenting (Lexington Books)

Ed. Women’s Culture (Scarecrow Press)

Ed. Women’s Culture Revisited. (Scarecrow Press, 2005)

The Religious Ideas of Harriet Beecher Stowe. Edwin Mellen Press.

Essential Energy Tools book and 3 videos. (Equality Press)

21st Century Families: Blueprints for Family-Friendly Workplaces,

Schools and Governments. (Equality Press)

The Teen Trip: The Complete Resource Guide (Equality Press)

Ed. Everything You Need to Know to Succeed After College (Equality

Press)

How to Survive Your Parents’ Divorce (Equality Press)

Ed., Quick Healthy Recipes: Literacy Fundraiser (Equality Press)

Your Mindful Guide to Academic Success: Beat Burnout (Equality Press)

Ageism in Youth Studies: A Maligned Generation (Cambridge Scholars Publishing)

 

In Process

Democracy Uprisings Led by Global Youth

Tactics and Goals for Changemaking

Recent Feminism in India

 

Young Women in the Egyptian Revolution of 2011

A study of 11 young women’s personal blogs about the revolution reported that before Jan25, the general mood was frustration and depression about harassment of women, government corruption, street children, etc. The moral shock of Khaled Said’s murder aroused anger, followed by excitement after the Tunisian revolution and the large turnout on the Day of Rage. Deppy wrote on February 6, “Yesterday, I was a girl who stood on the verge of hopelessness, who lost faith in a better tomorrow, who was living like a zombie at one time….Today, I am a girl with a fresh born patriotism, with a full tank of enthusiasm, with a handful of bubbly dreams.” They remarked about helpfulness and the lack of sexual harassment and not wanting to leave the “angels” in the square. They commented on the diversity of ages in the square, including children chanting “Down with Mubarak!” Despite the fact that the bloggers wrote that many women had to fight with their families to participate, threatened with being cut off financially or cursed, many women were in Tahrir. After Mubarak resigned on February 11, people were euphoric and youth directed traffic in the streets. Euphoria changed to confusion and disorientation; Sina wrote, “True, this has been a leaderless revolution, but now, when all people seek answers, we need someone to respond.” Misogyny reappeared as in the virginity checks and attacks on the International Women’s Day march where bystanders shouted that male demonstrations were gay and should wear a veil and that the women were whores, agents of Suzanne Mubarak and the West.

Susana Galan, “’Today I have seen Angels in Shape of Humans,” An Emotional History of the Egyptian Revolution through the Narratives of Female Personal Bloggers,” Journal of International Women’s Studies, Vol. 13, No. 5, October 2012.

http://vc.bridgew.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1003&context=jiws

Girls in Global News

Global attention to young women’s issues and activism was ignited by Malala Yousafzai’s advocacy of education for Pakistani girls, protests against the gang rape of New Delhi student who fought back referred to as Braveheart, “Bring Back Our Girls” protests against kidnapping of Nigerian school girls by Boko Haram, the murder of hundreds of girls and women in northern Mexico and indigenous girls in Canada, global SlutWalks, Take Back the Night marches, and young women’s leadership in the Arab Spring.

Who would you add?