15 women leading action against climate change

https://time.com/5669038/women-climate-change-leaders/#greta-thunberg

 

By TIME Staff

September 12, 2019

From sinking islands to drought-ridden savannas, women bear an outsize burden of the global—warming crisis, largely because of gender inequalities. In many parts of the world, women hold traditional roles as the primary caregivers in families and communities, and, as the main providers of food and fuel, are more vulnerable when flooding and drought occur; the U.N. estimates 80% of those who have been displaced by climate change are women.

Given their position on the front line of the climate-change battle, women are uniquely situated to be agents of change—to help find ways to mitigate the causes of global warming and to adapt to its impacts on the ground. This reality was recognized by the Paris Agreement, which specifically included the global need to further empower women in climate decision-making. Today, across the world, from boardrooms and policy positions to local communities, from science to activism, women everywhere are using their voices to take leadership and call for action on climate change.

We’ve chosen 15 such women to highlight, in profiles spread throughout the rest of this issue of TIME.

Anti-sexual harassment movement in Egypt

https://www.academia.edu/19654617/Arab_Women_Red_Lines_The_Anti-Sex

Arab Women, Red Lines: The Anti-Sexual Harassment Movement in Egypt

Sophia Sepúlveda

 

Since the Egyptian revolution of 2011, national and international reports noting the prevalence of sexual street harassment in Egypt have proliferated, establishing sexual harassment as one of Egypt’s greatest societal ills. Although sexual harassment is a global phenomenon, its existence in Egypt is particularly notable due to the high percentage of Egyptian women who have experienced some form of this type of violence in their lifetime. In this thesis, I trace the development of the phenomenon in Egypt, and emphasize the importance of formulating a national response appropriate to the Egyptian context, rather than implanting the international human rights regime’s formula and approach to the issue. I argue that this contextual response exists in the form of an Anti-Sexual Harassment (A-SH) movement, composed of Egyptian civil society groups and latent networks of female victims and their allies. This thesis examines prominent social movement theories for their capacity to explain the rise of this movement, and critiques them for their dependence on Western social movements as models of analysis, and subsequent assumptions of non-authoritarian state contexts. I conclude that the contextual and local focus of the A-SH movement has allowed it to achieve societal impact and to shift public understanding of sexual harassment. In identifying the impending opportunities and challenges presented by Egypt’s authoritarian regime and increasing foreign involvement, I emphasize the need for the movement to remain autonomous and contextual in focus.

Free instructional feminist videos on changing gender roles, visions of the future, etc.

Feminist Visions of the Future https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5sJszKFyJ08&t=52s

 

The Changing Family https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-QLXwtlxLBE

 

Men’s Changing Roles https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OdYjjkN11dA

 

Dual-Earner Families https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zwlkudBDeVQ&t=73s

 

These videos were produced at CSUChico in the early 1980s.

 

Also on Gayle Kimball’s YouTube channel, recent interviews with young women activists, women politicians, etc.

Hong Kong Democracy Activists have a new anthem “Raise the Umbrella”

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/12/world/asia/glory-to-hong-kong-anthem.html?

Lo Hiu Pan, who composed “Raise the Umbrella,” said on Thursday that while his song benefited from the work with celebrity singers, a new song did not have to be a poppy ballad fit for the mainstream to become popular in Hong Kong. Just speaking to the political experience of the moment is enough to catch fire and connect people, he said, adding that he thought “Glory to Hong Kong” was “powerful.”

“Sometimes a photo, comic or a song can spread out the message even more usefully than a long article,” he said.